Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants Provides No Academic Benefits: Study

A new study adds to the growing body of research indicating that nonmedical use of prescription stimulants for students without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely provides no academic benefits.

Many students use prescription ADHD drugs such as Ritalin or Adderall in response to academic difficulties, thinking these drugs will help them improve their grades, according to the researchers from the College Life Study at the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Full story of ADHD drugs and academic benefits study at drugfree.org

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Men and Suicide: A Neural Basis for the Acquired Capability

The high rate of fatal suicidal behavior in men is an urgent issue as highlighted in the public eye via news sources and media outlets.  This advanced CE course addresses this issue while attempting to understand the neural substrates underlying the gender differences in the rate of fatal suicidal behavior.

Behavioral Health Screening in HIV Care Settings

Behavioral health screening is an important step for health care provider organizations to increase access to quality behavioral health care.  This CEU course provides steps and examples that organizations can follow to build effective behavioral health screening that supports a system of integrated care.

Domestic Violence Offender Program Standards

Domestic violence, as a learned behavior, is supported by a system of beliefs and attitudes and requires a variety of approaches to prevent, reduce, and eliminate it.  This CEU course provides standards that are designed to address the patterns and dynamics of male to female violence, control, and abuse.  These standards are intended to serve as a framework for program providers to develop and deliver domestic violence services.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Ignition Interlocks Prevent Deadly Drunk-Driving Accidents

A new study finds ignition interlocks, devices that prevent a person from starting a car if their blood alcohol level is too high, prevents deadly accidents.

Ignition interlocks are associated with a 7 percent decrease in the rate of fatal crashes involving at least one drunk driver, researchers report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Cars with the device will not start if the driver’s blood alcohol level exceeds a preset limit, HealthDay reports.

Full story of ignition interlocks preventing drunk driving accidents at drugfree.org

Fewer People See E-Cigarettes as a Safe Alternative to Smoking Tobacco

The percentage of Americans who view e-cigarettes as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco is dropping, a new study suggests. Researchers found 43 percent of those surveyed in 2014 said they thought e-cigarettes were less harmful than cigarettes, compared with half of those surveyed in 2012, according to HealthDay.

The findings are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full story of fewer people seeing e-cigarettes as safe alternative at drugfree.org

More Than Half of U.S. Doctors Reducing Opioid Prescriptions: Survey

A new survey finds more than half of U.S. doctors are reducing the number of opioid prescriptions they write. Almost 10 percent have stopped prescribing opioids altogether, The Boston Globe reports.

More than one-third of doctors surveyed said reducing opioid prescribing has hurt patients with chronic pain. The survey was conducted for the newspaper by the SERMO physicians social network, an online community that allows doctors to anonymously share ideas and concerns.

Full story of doctors reducing opioid prescriptions at drugfree.org