Warning: include(/home/que/blog.pestcontrolceus.com/htdocs/wp-admin/maint/plugin-editors.php) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/quantumblog/blog.quantumunitsed.com/htdocs/wp-content/themes/regal/header.php on line 153

Warning: include() [function.include]: Failed opening '/home/que/blog.pestcontrolceus.com/htdocs/wp-admin/maint/plugin-editors.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/share/php:/usr/share/pear') in /home/quantumblog/blog.quantumunitsed.com/htdocs/wp-content/themes/regal/header.php on line 153

Archive for May, 2012

Study Supports Using Lungs Transplanted From Smokers

Posted by on Thursday, 31 May, 2012

Lung Transplant For SmokersPeople who receive a lung transplanted from a smoker live longer than people who need a transplant and don’t receive one, a new study finds.

While getting a lung from a smoker was better than not receiving one at all, it still was not as beneficial as receiving a lung from a non-smoker. The three-year survival rate for recipients of lungs transplanted from smokers was lower than for recipients of lungs from non-smokers, ABC News reports. Recipients of smokers’ lungs also had more complications. The study included 1,295 lung transplant recipients, 39 percent of whom received lungs from people who had previously smoked.

The findings support a policy of transplanting lungs from people who have smoked, the researchers said. “Donors with positive smoking histories provide nearly 40 percent of the lungs available for transplantation,” they wrote in The Lancet. “Rejection of this donor-organ resource would increase waiting-list mortality and is ill advised.”

Full story of lung transplants at DrugFree.org

Photos courtesy of and copyright stock.xchng, http://www.sxc.hu/


What Your Facebook Picture Says About Your Background

Posted by on Wednesday, 30 May, 2012

Facebook Pictures Show BackgroundFor millions of its Western users, the picture they choose to illustrate themselves on Facebook is an important decision to make. They know it can be the first impression that anyone in the world receives of them, so they’re often deeply conscious of what features are displayed and what flaws are hidden by their chosen image. But despite their careful deliberation the decision may not be a personal or independent one at all — the choice may be more conditioned by cultural factors than anyone assumes.

According to new research published in the International Journal of Psychology, the Facebook profile pictures of Americans and other Westerners are more likely to zoom-in and focus on the individual’s face than those of Facebookers from the more collectivistic and interdependent cultures of East Asia, whose profile pics generally pull-out to include more background features.

Full story of Facebook pictures at Science Daily

Photos courtesy of and copyright stock.xchng, http://www.sxc.hu/


Finally, a treatment for that buzzing in your ears

Posted by on Tuesday, 29 May, 2012

Treatment For Buzzing EarsImagine the incessant, grating sound of buzzing in your ears – or constant beeping, whistling, dripping, or clicking.  Imagine the chatter of crickets or birds resonating in your head all day long.

Then realize that there are no actual birds or crickets. No dripping faucet. No clicking or whistling happening in the vicinity.

That is a small glimpse of life with tinnitus:  The perception of sound, that doesn’t exist, manufactured by the brain. 

"I hear tree frogs and crickets and bugs, and really loud noise on top of that," said Ginny Morrell, 60, who has suffered with tinnitus for two years. "It started one day and never went away. It never wavers, 24 hours a day."
Morrell says she fills her life with sound – a radio during the day, a television droning in the background while she sleeps – as a way to drown out the din.  It’s a distraction that sometimes works.

"It’s not going to kill me, it’s not cancer," said Morrell.  "But it might drive me crazy."

But according to a new study, the most effective treatment for Morrell’s tinnitus may involve just the opposite of what she’s currently doing: Rather than ignoring the sound, focus on it.

Full story of ear buzzing at CNN Health

Photos courtesy of and copyright stock.xchng, http://www.sxc.hu/


Beware of Drunk Drivers on Memorial Day Weekend

Posted by on Friday, 25 May, 2012

Beware of Drunk Driving This MemorialDrunk drivers are a threat on the road during Memorial Day weekend, warns Fox Business. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 397 people died over the three-day weekend in 2010, the latest year for which data is available. Of those crashes, 40 percent were alcohol-related.

In 2010, more than 10,000 people died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes—one every 51 minutes, notes the NHTSA. The agency has found fatal crashes involving an alcohol-impaired driver are more likely on weekends and at night, the article notes.

Alcohol interferes with a person’s coordination, driving skills and judgment. Drinking can cause people to lose control and become aggressive, which can in turn affect driving skills.

Full story of drunk drivers at DrugFree.org

Photos courtesy of and copyright stock.xchng, http://www.sxc.hu/


Learn something new – your brain will thank you

Posted by on Thursday, 24 May, 2012

Train Your Brain Something NewThe idea that learning a new skill – say juggling, cooking, or playing guitar – can be like an addiction is no joke.

I should know. As a college professor/scientist, who has written about the dynamics of narcotics and self-control, I have spent the last 3 1/2 years all but addicted to learning to play guitar. Despite lacking anything that might remotely resemble musical talent, I find no day is complete without at least a little bit of time on the guitar.

Even listening to music can be a little like a drug. A brain imaging study that came out last year proved what many scientists long suspected: Listening to music can lead the brain to release the neurotransmitter dopamine. Dopamine is the brain’s universal signal for pleasure, an internal system that tells the brain (sometimes rightly, sometime wrongly) that it is doing the right thing.

Drugs elicit dopamine artificially by fooling the brain, while activities like sex and eating elicit dopamine naturally. Listening to music taps into the dopamine system in part because hearing something new is a signal that the brain is learning something, and we have evolved to enjoy acquiring new information.

Full story of brain feeding at CNN Health

Photos courtesy of and copyright stock.xchng, http://www.sxc.hu/