‘Hair of the dog’ won’t cure that hangover

In medieval Europe, when astrology and blood-letting were frequently employed in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, one therapy for rabies was to place some pieces of hair from the rabid dog onto the victim’s bite wound.

It didn’t work.

But it did give rise to the notion that “the hair of the dog that bit you” — a drink — can cure a hangover. This concept is rather ancient, too, having first appeared in print in 1546.

It doesn’t work, either.

“There’s no scientific evidence that having an alcoholic drink will cure a hangover,” said Laura Veach, Ph.D., director of screening and counseling intervention services and training in the Department of Surgery at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “It will, at best, postpone one.”

Full story of ‘hair of the dog’ and hangovers at Science Daily

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Will Savage

Quantum Units Continuing Education provides online CEU training's to licensed professional mental health therapists, counselors, social workers and nurses. Our blog provides updates in the field of news and research related to mental health and substance abuse treatment.