More access to opioid treatment programs needed in Southeast, says study

In 2015, more than 30,000 Americans died from overdosing on opioids, and a new study led by the University of Georgia shows that one of the hardest hit populations — low-income Americans on Medicaid — isn’t getting the help it needs to combat opioid addiction.

The researchers analyzed data from the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services to compare county-level distributions of opioid use disorder rates with opioid treatment programs that accept Medicaid. The study, published in Health Services Research, found that large portions of the Southeast don’t have enough opioid treatment programs to match their high rates of opioid use disorder, or OUD.

In many of the counties, there aren’t any treatment programs, and where there are programs, they are more likely to be run by for-profit providers, the majority of which do not accept Medicaid.

Full story of access to opioid treatment programs at Science Daily

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Will Savage

Quantum Units Continuing Education provides online CEU training's to licensed professional mental health therapists, counselors, social workers and nurses. Our blog provides updates in the field of news and research related to mental health and substance abuse treatment.