Smokers Can Increase Quit Rates if They Take Medication Before They’re Ready to Stop

A new study finds smokers who start taking smoking-cessation medication before they are ready to quit have greater success once they do want to stop.

Doctors are currently advised to follow clinical practice guidelines that recommend patients set a quit date before they are prescribed smoking cessation pills such as Chantix, the medication used in the new study. Chantix is made by Pfizer, which funded the study, according to The New York Times.

The study included 1,500 smokers at 61 clinics in the United States and abroad. None of the smokers said they wanted to quit right away, but they all said they wanted to smoke less, and to quit within three months. Half of the smokers took Chantix twice a day, and the other half took placebo pills. Almost one-third of smokers who took Chantix quit within six months, compared with 6 percent of those taking the placebo.

Full story of smokers and smoking-cessation medication at drugfree.org

Published by

Will Savage

Quantum Units Continuing Education provides online CEU training's to licensed professional mental health therapists, counselors, social workers and nurses. Our blog provides updates in the field of news and research related to mental health and substance abuse treatment.