Study questions brain benefit of omega-3s (VIDEO)

If there were a food or dietary supplement guaranteed to help preserve our thinking skills, memory and verbal fluency later in life, we’d all take it. Unfortunately, we don’t have such a miracle pill.

Omega-3 fatty acids, found in fatty fish and nuts, have been touted as potential brain-boosters in aging. In some studies they were shown to be associated with a lower risk of dementia.

A new study in the journal Neurology is a knock against that theory, but more research needs to be done to confirm, as it does not prove or disprove a cause-and-effect relationship.

“Our study was observational and should not be viewed as a definitive answer on the relationship between omega-3s and cognitive function,” lead study author Eric Ammann of the University of Iowa said in an e-mail. “In making health-related decisions about diet and supplements, we would advise people to consider the total body of evidence and to consult with their health care providers.”

Participants

The study looked at 2,157 women aged 65 to 80 who had normal cognition and were already enrolled in a clinical trial for hormone therapy. They were part of a sub-study of the large Women’s Health Initiative study.

Researchers followed the participants for a median of 5.9 years.

Full story of omega-3s and brain research at CNN Health

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