Can you OD on caffeine?

The rumor: It’s possible to get caffeine poisoning

As he was driving down an Ohio freeway minutes after swallowing five Magnum 357 caffeine pills, Christian Brenner started to vibrate — and the cars in his rearview mirror did as well. Fortunately, Brenner pulled over and walked around in an effort to try and come down.

Today, he swears off caffeine, even coffee — the mental aftereffect of what he says was straight-up caffeine poisoning.

The verdict: Yes, you can OD on caffeine. The trick is to know your body, pay attention to what else you’ve ingested and do your homework on energy drinks

Caffeine acts as a stimulant in humans. It can be found in the seeds, leaves and fruit of plants like coffee or kola nuts.

“Safe doses of caffeine are usually quoted at around 200 to 300 milligrams, or two to four cups of coffee per day,” says Dr. David Seres, associate professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University.

Full story of OD on caffeine at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Oreos as ‘addictive’ as cocaine in lab rat study

Anyone who’s ever eaten an Oreo knows how difficult it can be to eat just one.

Scientists have long suspected that our brains crave junk food in the same way they crave other pleasurable substances, such as illegal drugs. Previous studies in rodents and in humans have shown the same area of the brain that lights up on scans when people use drugs, also shows increased activity when study participants consume, or even look at, high fat, high sugar foods like ice cream or bacon.

Some scientists believe certain foods trigger the brain to signal for more, similar to the way addictive drugs prompt cravings; if we don’t fulfill the brain’s request, the body could produce a physical response (like caffeine headaches) similar to withdrawal symptoms.

New research from undergraduate students at Connecticut College adds to the growing evidence suggesting that food can be addictive. The students were interested in understanding how the availability of junk food in low-income areas has contributed to America’s obesity epidemic.

“Even though we associate significant health hazards in taking drugs like cocaine and morphine, high-fat, high-sugar foods may present even more of a danger because of their accessibility and affordability,” study designer and neuroscience major Jamie Honohan said in a statement.

Full story of oreos and cocaine at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

New Online CEU Courses – Quantum Units Education

NEW QUANTUM LOGOQuantum Units Education has added several new online CEU Courses to their curriculum

Effective Communication for Program Success

This course covers the most effective way to make requests and offers so others know exactly what you are asking for, how people can respond to requests in ways that create strong commitments, and how people can manage commitments so that work gets done efficiently. By using the language and process offered in this course individuals and organizations can increase both program success and personal well-being.

Cultural Elements in Treating Addiction in Latino Populations

This course is based upon a guide that was written for counselors treating clients from Latino cultures. It’s purpose is to help counselors and therapists improve their skills in response to treatment challenges working with Latinos. The approach taken is to highlight key similarities and differences in cultural beliefs, attitudes and practices commonly seen among Latino clients.

Managing Chronic Pain in Substance Abusing Clients

Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is common in the general population as well as in people who have substance use disorder (SUD). This course is directed at primary care providers who treat or are likely to treat adults patients with or in recovery from SUDs who present with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP).

Measuring Employee Performance

Guidelines are provided for writing performance elements and standards and maximizing the capability of performance plans for focusing employee efforts on achieving organizational and group goals.

For these new course and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

More Women Could Receive Addiction Treatment Under Health Reform: Expert

The number of women receiving treatment for substance use disorders could rise under changes that will be implemented as part of health care reform, according to an expert at UCLA.

Christine Grella, PhD, Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, says some aspects of the Affordable Care Act are likely to make it easier for women to access care.

She spoke about the implications of health care reform for addiction treatment for women at the recent American Psychological Association annual meeting.

Dr. Grella noted that men are about twice as likely as women to report having a substance use disorder. A higher proportion of men – 30.5 percent – with current substance dependence seek some kind of help, compared with 24 percent of women.

Women are likely to cite lack of insurance, as well as social stigma, as barriers to addiction treatment, Dr. Grella said. While men cite these barriers too, they are disproportionately influential in women.

Full story of addiction treatment under health reform at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Addiction: The disease that lies

Anytime I hear about a death that may be linked to addiction, I am reminded that this is a misunderstood and deadly disease. Deaths caused by addiction have risen astronomically in the past decade. Drug overdose is now the No.1 cause of accidental death in the United States; more common than death by car accidents.

“Glee” actor Cory Monteith, who was found dead at a Vancouver hotel on Saturday, had said that he struggled with substance abuse since his teenage years. The cause of his death is not yet known; medical examiners were set to perform an autopsy Monday.

Whenever someone with addiction dies, I grieve the lost potential and wonder about the limitations of our ability to address this cunning, baffling and powerful disease.

I am also humbled by my own experience with addiction and recovery, and grateful for the help I received.

It seems nearly impossible to believe that people with addiction would continue to use drugs and alcohol to the point of death, but that is what people with addiction do: They deny both the consequences and the risks of using. As we continue to learn about addiction, we’re understanding more about why addicted people behave the way they do. But that’s little solace for friends and family.

Full story about addiction and abuse at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education