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Posts Tagged depression

Surprising causes of winter depression

Posted by on Thursday, 26 December, 2013

When the weather turns cold and daylight hours dwindle, it’s easy to blame seasonal affective disorder (SAD) for a blue mood.

But chances are, there’s a whole lot more to your SAD story. Before you flip on a light box, make sure these other seasonal mood-busters aren’t dragging you down.

You’re not moving enough

Cold temps make it all too easy to curl up on the couch and let your gym habit slide, but it’s common knowledge that regular exercise holds the power to lift your spirits.

“Moving around is helpful to everyone’s mood,” says Harvard psychologist Dr. John Sharp, author of “The Emotional Calendar.”

You don’t even have to commit to a full-on routine. In a study published in Perception and Motor Skills, researchers found that even a single exercise session at any intensity can increase positive mood feelings and decrease the negative ones. If you live in a wintery clime, take advantage of the snowshoeing and ice skating to shake up your exercise routine.

Full story of causes for winter depression at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education


CDC: 6% of teens take psychotropic drugs

Posted by on Monday, 9 December, 2013

The debate around adolescents and psychotropic drug use may be quieted – ever so slightly – by new data.

More than 6% of adolescents reported using psychotropic medications during the past month, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Six percent is pretty much what I would expect for the prescription of psychotropic medications based on what we know about new disorders and how prevalent they would be among adolescents,” said Bruce Jonas, a mental health epidemiologist with the National Center for Health Statistics at the CDC, who compiled the data.

Psychotropic medications are used to alter the mood, behavior or overall functioning of persons with certain mental health conditions.

According to the survey, which accounts for medication use between 2005-2010, adolescents were evenly split between taking antidepressants (3.2%) and drugs to address attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (3.2%), with relatively smaller numbers reporting taking drugs to treat conditions such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

About 8% of 12-17 year olds in the United States have major depression, while about 11% of 4-17 year olds are diagnosed with ADHD, according to federal data.

Full story of teens on psychotropic drugs at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education


More than 1,100 have cancer after 9/11

Posted by on Thursday, 12 September, 2013

Reggie Hilaire was a rookie cop on September 11, 2001. He worked at ground zero for 11 days beside his colleagues — many of them, including Hilaire, not wearing a mask. He was later assigned to a landfill in Staten Island, where debris from the World Trade Center was dumped.

For about 60 days between 2001 and 2002, the New York police officer was surrounded by dust.

In 2005, Hilaire was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. He underwent surgery and radiation. Just months later his doctor told him he also had multiple myeloma, a blood cancer that multiplies the body’s plasma cells to dangerous levels.

It’s a cancer that usually strikes much later in life. Hilaire was 34.

More than 1,100 people who worked or lived near the World Trade Center on 9/11 have been diagnosed with cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A few months ago Hilaire received a letter from the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, officially offering him medical insurance under the World Trade Center Health Program.About 1,140 people have been certified to receive cancer treatment under the WTC Health Program, a representative told CNN.

These are the first numbers released since the program was expanded a year ago.

Full story of 9/11 victims with cancer at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education


Putting Sleep Disorders to Bed: New Way to Improve Internal Clock Function

Posted by on Friday, 23 August, 2013

Overnight flights across the Atlantic, graveyard shifts, stress-induced insomnia are all prime culprits in keeping us from getting a good night’s sleep. Thanks to new research from McGill University and Concordia University, however, these common sleep disturbances may one day be put to bed.

The rotation of Earth generates day and night. It also confers daily rhythms to all living beings. In mammals, something known as a “circadian clock” in the brain drives daily rhythms in sleep and wakefulness, feeding and metabolism, and many other essential processes. But the inner workings of this brain clock are complex, and the molecular processes behind it have eluded scientists — until now.

In a new study published in Neuron, researchers have identified how a fundamental biological process called protein synthesis is controlled within the body’s circadian clock — the internal mechanism that controls one’s daily rhythms. Their findings may help shed light on future treatments for disorders triggered by circadian clock dysfunction, including jet lag, shift work disorders, and chronic conditions like depression and Parkinson’s disease.

“To understand and treat the causes and symptoms of circadian abnormalities, we have to take a closer look at the fundamental biological mechanisms that control our internal clocks,” says study co-author Dr. Shimon Amir, professor in Concordia University’s Department of Psychology.

Full story of improving the internal clock at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education


Teen Eating Disorders Increase Suicide Risk

Posted by on Wednesday, 24 July, 2013

Is binge eating a tell-tale sign of suicidal thoughts? According to a new study of African American girls, by Dr. Rashelle Musci and colleagues from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University in the US, those who experience depressive and anxious symptoms are often dissatisfied with their bodies and more likely to display binge eating behaviors. These behaviors put them at higher risk for turning their emotions inward, in other words, displaying internalizing symptoms such as suicide.

The study is published online in Springer’s journal, Prevention Science.

With the focus on appearance in Western culture, it is not uncommon for many girls and women to have eating behavior problems. The most frequently occurring problem eating behaviors are binge eating, or eating large amounts of food in a short period of time and feeling out of control while eating. This behavior leads to shame, embarrassment, distress and an attempt to conceal it.

Full story of teen eating disorders and suicide at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education