One in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder after overdose

A new study found that one in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder within 12 months of a non-fatal opioid overdose. The study, led by researchers at Boston Medical Center’s Grayken Center for Addiction, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), shows which medications — buprenorphine, methadone or naltrexone — are being taken, and how long after the overdose they receive the treatment. Published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine, the results provide important new data that can help increase access and time to medication for opioid use disorder for young adults who survive an overdose, including in an emergency department setting.

Nonfatal opioid overdose is a significant predictor for recurrent nonfatal and fatal opioid overdoses. Young adults (under age 25) have been disproportionately affected by the opioid epidemic, as data indicates that drug overdose deaths nearly quadrupled nationally between 1999 and 2016 in young adults between 15 and 24 years old. Research shows that young adults have distinct developmental differences that predispose them to substance use disorders, which requires strategically designed interventions to engage and retain them in treatment.

Full story at Science Daily

‘New lead’ in hunt for better schizophrenia drugs

The so-called negative symptoms of schizophrenia, which include anhedonia, can be particularly debilitating. One recent study attempted to identify their neurological roots.

Schizophrenia is a mental health condition that affects an estimated 1% of the United States population.

Scientists tend to divide symptoms into two broad categories: positive and negative.

Positive symptoms include delusions, racing thoughts, and hallucinations.

Full story at Medical News Today

In Russia, declines in alcohol consumption and mortality have gone hand in hand

Since the early 2000s, Russia has seen significant declines in overall alcohol consumption, and a new review shows that there has been a parallel, steep decline in the country’s mortality rates as well.

Much of this decline in drinking has been the result of economic factors, evolving patterns of alcohol consumption, and alcohol policies enacted by the government, according to the review, published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs.

In Russia today, life expectancy for men and women is 6.1 and 4.7 years longer, respectively, than it was in 1980, with alcohol consumption patterns playing a disproportionate role.

Full story at Medical Xpress

What to know about Xanax overdose

People take Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Taking too much Xanax can cause mild to serious side effects, and taking other drugs along with Xanax can increase the risk of overdose.

The generic name of Xanax is alprazolam. Along with its use for anxiety, some people use Xanax for sleeplessness, premenstrual disorder, and depression. However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have not currently approved the drug for these uses.

Some people have used Xanax for recreational purposes because it relieves anxiety. When people use drugs without a prescription, there is an increased risk of drug misuse and possible overdose.

Full story at Medical News Today

For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away

Methadone is often used in the fight against opioid addiction, but long travel times in rural areas may be hampering efforts to get more people treated, a new study finds.

If methadone for opioid addiction was available in primary care clinics, more people would have better access to treatment, researchers suggest.

In the United States, methadone is only available at clinics certified by the federal government as Opioid Treatment Programs, or OTPs. This restriction, along with state and local laws, limits the number of clinics that offer methadone for opioid addiction.

Full story at HealthDay