Prescription Drug Use on the Rise in U.S.

Prescription Drug AbuseStudy Shows About 48% of Americans Take at Least 1 Prescription Drug

Prescription drug use in the U.S. has been rising steadily in the past decade and the trend shows no signs of slowing, the CDC says in a new report.

The study, published in the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief No. 42, says the percentage of Americans who took at least one prescription drug rose from 43.5% in 1999-2000 to 48.3% in the 2007-2008 period.

The use of two or more drugs increased from 25.4% to 31.2% over the same decade, and the use of five or more prescription medications jumped from 6.3% to 10.7%.

The report also says that in the 2007-2008 period:

  • One of every five children and nine out of 10 older Americans reported using at least one prescription drug in the month prior to being surveyed.
  • 22.4% of kids up to age 11 used at least one prescription drug.
  • 29.9% of young people 12-19 used at least one prescription drug.
  • 48.3% of people between 20 and 59 used at least one prescription medication.
  • 88.4% of Americans age 60 and over used at least one prescription drug, more than 76% used two or more prescription drugs in the past month, and 37% used five or more.

People without health insurance or a regular place to go for medical problems had less prescription drug use compared to those with such benefits.

Age and Gender Are Key

The report notes that prescription drug use increased with age, that women were more likely to use such medications than men, 53.3% to 43.2%, and the non-Hispanic white population had the highest prescription drug use at 54.3%, compared to 42% of black non-Hispanics and 33.9% of Mexican-Americans.

The CDC also says that:

  • People with a regular place for health care were 2.7 times as likely to have used prescription drugs in the past month compared to those without the benefit.
  • People with health insurance were about twice as likely to have used at least one prescription medication in the past month as those without health insurance.
  • People with prescription drug benefits in their health insurance plans were 22% more likely to use prescription medications than those who did not have that benefit.

Most Common Prescribed Drugs

According to the 2007-2008 data, the most commonly used drugs were:

  • Bronchodilators for children up to age 11.
  • Central nervous system stimulants for youths 12-19.
  • Antidepressants for people 20-59.
  • Cholesterol lowering drugs for adults 60 and older.
  • Among kids under age 6, penicillin antibiotics were the most frequently use prescription drugs.

The report says diuretics and beta-blockers were commonly used in adults and older Americans, with such medications used most often to treat heart problems and high blood pressure.

Article originally reported on WebMd:
http://www.webmd.com/news/20100902/prescription-drug-use-on-the-rise-in-the-u-s?src=RSS_PUBLIC

SOURCE:
National Center for Health Statistics: “NCHS Data Brief No. 42, September 2010.”

Italian Youths Who Drink With Meals Are Less Often Adult Problem-Drinkers

Underage Drinking
Underage Drinking

Italian youths whose parents allowed them to have alcohol with meals while they were growing up are less likely to develop harmful drinking patterns in the future, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher.

In a paper published in the journal Addiction, Research and Theory,a research team led by Lee Strunin, PhD, a professor of community health sciences at BUSPH, detailed their study of the drinking patterns and histories of 160 Italian adolescents and young adults who identified themselves as regular or heavy drinkers. The authors concluded that the introduction of a moderate amount of alcohol in a family setting could prevent young people from binge drinking and nurture healthier drinking behaviors.

“Young people allowed alcohol with meals when growing up were more likely to never drink 5 [or more drinks] or get drunk,” the authors wrote. If they did drink more heavily, it was typically at a “later age than participants who weren’t allowed alcohol in a family setting.”

The researchers interviewed two groups of young people in the Italian regions of Abruzzo and Umbria. One consisted of 80 young adults aged 25-30; the second consisted of 80 adolescents, 16 to18 years old. “We were fortunate to be able to have such a large study sample to interview to help us understand this phenomenon,” said Strunin.

Although the results focused on Italy, Strunin said they could be applied to different countries and could “assist in the design of policies to reduce alcohol problems and harmful behavior among young people.”

Other reports have also suggested that alcohol introduced in a family setting may reduce alcohol-related risk behavior among young people, according to Strunin. Part of the reason, she said, could be that when alcohol is allowed, it is in a context in which there is openness about drinking, and moderate drinking with meals is considered normal.

“Youths in these cultures learn to drink more responsibly than their U.S. counterparts because drinking is culturally normative, exposure occurs at a younger age, and alcohol is part of the fabric of family mores,” said the report.

It is important to note, the authors wrote, that the study focused on youths and young adults who drank wine during a meal with their family. “In talking about drinking in the family, we are talking about meal drinking, not sitting down with your child watching the football or baseball game with a six-pack,” Strunin said. “The wine drinking is part of the meal.

In addition to Strunin, co-authors of the study are: Kirstin Lindeman of BUSPH; Enrico Tempesta and Simona Anav of Osservatorio Permanente sui Giovani e l’Alcool, Rome, Italy; and Pierluigi Ascani and Luza Parisi of Format Research, Rome, Italy.

Funding for this study came from a grant from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Story originally published at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100819112224.htm

New CEU Courses – Eating Disorders, Suicide Prevention, Alcohol Screening

Due to the number of requests we’ve received to add shorter courses you will see we’ve added 2 small 1 CEU hour courses and 1-2 CEU Hour course. Please Note: NBCC does not recognize courses that are below 2 CEU hours, therefore these courses will not apply towards NBCC credit. See our FAQ topic below the list of courses on ‘What is the difference between NBCC and Standard CEU hours?’

Next month we will be adding a new category to our list – Grief & Loss – which will feature courses written by a new addition to our team, Gabriel Constans. Gabriel has a Ph.D. in Death Education. Keep a look out for next month’s newsletter for more information.


Eating Disorders Update
Standard CEU Hours: 1   CEU Cost: $3.00
NBCC CEU Hours: NA        CEU Cost: NA

This short pamphlet discusses eating disorders as treatable diseases and covers topics such as: Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge-Eating Disorder, FDA Warnings on Anti-Depressants, Effects on Male Populations and advances in treatment.
Facebook Twitter Digg

Meeting the Suicidal Person
Standard CEU Hours: 1   CEU Cost: $3.00
NBCC CEU Hours: NA        CEU Cost: NA

This paper discusses appropriate clinical attitudes and practices of clinicians when meeting with suicidal patients. Also discussed is the patient-oriented approach to suicide prevention.
Facebook Twitter Digg

Alcohol Screening & Brief Interventions for Public Health Practitioners
Standard CEU Hours: 2   CEU Cost: $6.00
NBCC CEU Hours: 2        CEU Cost: $6.00

Screening and Brief Intervention:
1.
is designed for use by service providers who do not specialize in addiction treatment
2. uses motivational approaches based on how ready the person is to change behavior
3. gives feedback and suggestions respectfully in the form of useful information, without judgment or accusations
4. has been shown by research to be effective in reducing alcohol use and alcohol-related adverse consequences, including injury
Facebook Twitter Digg

Relapse Prevention in Older Adults
Standard CEU Hours: 16   CEU Cost: $48.00
NBCC CEU Hours: 16        CEU Cost: $48.00

This manual presents a relapse-prevention approach that uses the cognitive–behavioral and self-management intervention (CB/SM) in a counselor-led group treatment setting to help older adults overcome substance use disorders. It is for counselors and other treatment providers working with older adults who have substance use disorders. (For simplicity, “counselor” refers to any staff member who uses the manual for its intended purpose, and “CB/SM” refers to the specific forms and combination of cognitive–behavioral and self-management treatment approaches described in this manual for use with older adult clients.)
Facebook Twitter Digg


Your Frequently Asked Questions Answered

What is the difference between NBCC vs. Standard CEU Hours?
NBCC stands for the National Board of Certified Counselors. NBCC has a different set of standards on how their approved providers are to determine the number of hours awarded for courses taken by their licensees – thus the separation of course hours into 2 categories: Standard vs. NBCC.

While many state licensing boards approve our courses for license renewal based upon our pre-approved status with NBCC, this does not necessarily mean a participant will use NBCC hours. NBCC stated hours are for those individuals that hold a credential issued by NBCC, such as the NCC (National Certified Counselor), and will be submitting their certificates directly to NBCC for renewal. If a participant holds multiple licenses and credentials – of which one is issued by NBCC – then NBCC hours will take precedence.

The vast majority of our participants will take the ‘Standard’ CEU hours. If your board approves our courses due to our NBCC status you may take either ‘standard’ or ‘nbcc’ ceu hours. Only those participants with credentials issued by NBCC are mandated to take the NBCC hours.

Become a Part of Our Rapidly Growing Online Social Community!

Like Us on Facebook

Announcement of Website Upgrades

To All of Our Participants:

Thank you for your continued patronage of QUE as your CEU provider.

It is our policy to add 2 – 3 new courses each month to our site. However, March and April reflect huge upgrades to our website and program. As a result, new courses were not added. We are planning for new courses to be added in May.

Upgrades to the website are based upon a gathering of feedback over time from our participants. We appreciate and take seriously your feedback on the exam forms.

Please familiarize yourself below with the changes that have been made and that are still in the progress through the end of April.

Website
The website has been widened and the fonts changed and enlarged throughout to enhance viewing for participants who are visually impaired.


SmartLook Viewer

All course material now opens within the SmartLook Viewer. This was made available to improve the accessibility of our courses to even more participants. Within the Viewer you can: enlarge the fonts, email the course material to yourself or a friend, search for keywords, print the entire document at once or print just the page you are viewing. See how the SmartLook Viewer works.


Certificates

If you have an email address on file, certificates will automatically be ’emailed’ to all participants immediately after taking and paying for an online exam. As well, certificates will automatically be emailed to all home study participants. Be sure to check your inbox or your ‘spam’ folder for your certificates.


Exams
All online exams will be converted from the current ‘drop down’ menu answer choice to a ‘click button’ answer choice. This will make entering your answers on the electronic exam go much faster! You will see this change take place gradually with all existing exams throughout the month of April until all ‘current’ exams have been transferred to the new format.


Support

Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have. Telephone Support hours are Monday – Thursday from Noon to 4:00 pm PST. In order to keep prices at a minimum for our participants we are unable to provide full time telephone support. Toll Free (877) 665-3311. Leave a message and your call will be returned within a few hours and no later than 24 hours.

Our online support ticket system functions 7 days a week. You will receive a prompt response. An email address is required to use the online support system.