Depression raises risk of early death

Depression raises risk of early death

A large, long-term study has confirmed that both men and women who have had at least one major depressive episode have a significantly higher mortality risk. Moreover, this risk has progressively increased for women.

Depression is one of the most widespread mental disorders among adults in the United States. According to data provided by the National Institute of Mental Health, 6.7 percent of all U.S. adults had at least one major depressive episode in 2015 alone.

A major depressive episode, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, occurs when five or more of the following symptoms are consistently present for a period of 2 weeks: depressed mood, loss of pleasure in normally pleasurable activities, abnormal weight loss or weight gain, sleeplessness or oversleeping, abnormal physical agitation or slowness, fatigue, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, lack of focus, and “recurrent thoughts of death.”

Full story at Medical News Today