Studying Dating Abuse in the Internet Age

Non-physical abuse by a dating partner such as threats, controlling behavior and harassing text messages can have a serious effect on a teenager’s health and well-being, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

The study, which appears in the research journal BMC Public Health, is one of the first to examine the effects of both physical and non-physical dating abuse that is relevant to today’s highly connected adolescents.

While physical and sexual violence significantly affected the health and behavior of adolescents aged 13-19, non-physical abuse such as stalking through text messages or email also had a considerable effect, said Amy Bonomi, lead researcher on the study and chairperson and professor in MSU’s Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

“Often an argument in society is that abuse that is not physical or sexual really doesn’t matter,” Bonomi said. “Is it really harmful, for example, if I call my partner a bad name? Or if I’m harassing or stalking them with text messages? Well, we’ve shown that it does have a negative effect on health.”

Full story of internet dating abuse at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

QUANTUM UNITS EDUCATION: New CEUs from our APA Approved Sponsor

NEW QUANTUM LOGOQuantum Units Education has an all new category of CEU Courses available. Courses are offered by our APA (American Psychological Association) approved Sponsor. These courses are also approved for many other licensed and certified professionals throughout the United States that were unable to take courses from Quantum in the past such as Marriage and Family Therapists, Social Workers and Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs). So be sure to check out our State CEU approvals page to find out if your state board accepts courses offered by an approved sponsor of the American Psychological Association. Certificates issued for these courses will bear the name of our APA approved sponsor TeachME Professional Development, a subsidiary owned by Quantum.

See Our all New APA Sponsor Approved CEUs – New courses will be added to this new category monthly so stay tuned!

Below is a list of the courses available under this category:

Bullying In Schools: An Overview

Childhood Exposure to Family Violence

Electronic Aggression and Cyber-Bullying

Ethics for Psychologists

Reactive Attachment Disorder

Research Trends in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Trauma-Focused CBT for Children Affected by Sexual Abuse or Trauma

For these courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Minorities Less Likely to Complete Substance Abuse Treatment in Many States

A state-by-state analysis of substance abuse treatment programs finds that in many states, minorities are less likely than whites to successfully complete substance abuse programs. The analysis found significant disparities among states with regard to racial and ethnic differences.

Overall, 46.25 percent of whites, 45.6 percent of Latinos, and 37.5 percent of African-Americans completed substance abuse treatment programs, Newswise reports. In Tennessee, African-American clients were 35 percent less likely to complete treatment programs, compared with whites. In Vermont, Latinos were almost 22 percent less likely than whites to complete treatment programs.

While Latinos and African-Americans had lower completion rates in many states, there were some exceptions, the University of Iowa researchers found. In Hawaii, Utah and Mississippi, African-American clients were slightly more likely than whites to complete programs. Latinos were more likely than whites to complete programs in 17 states, including Texas, Florida, Oregon and Kansas.

Full story of minorities and treatment at DrugFre.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Sexual, emotional abuse scar the brain in specific ways

Childhood emotional and sexual abuse mark women’s brains in distinct patterns — with emotional abuse affecting regions involved in self-awareness and sexual abuse affecting areas involved in genital sensation, according to new research.

The study links specific types of abuse with symptoms experienced by many survivors later in life.

The research, which was published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, imaged the brains of 51 women in Atlanta who were taking part in a larger project on the effects of early trauma.

Twenty-eight of the participants had been seriously maltreated as children, suffering from various combinations of neglect and emotional, physical and sexual abuse. The other 23 experienced either no maltreatment or next to nothing. The women ranged in age from 18 to 45, but the average age was 27.

A standard questionnaire on childhood trauma was used to assess the women’s early-childhood experiences, and their brains were scanned to measure the thickness of various regions of the cortex.

Cortical thickness is linked to brain development, with thicker regions generally suggesting healthier growth. Brains, like muscles, develop through use — so regions that have been “exercised” more tend to be bigger.

Full story of sex and emotional abuse on the brain at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Jailhouse Phone Calls Reveal When Domestic Abusers Most Likely to Attack

Jailhouse Phone Calls and Domestic AbuseAn analysis of jailhouse phone calls between men charged with felony domestic violence and their victims allowed researchers for the first time to see exactly what triggered episodes of violent abuse.

The findings showed that violence often immediately followed accusations of sexual infidelity made by one or both of the partners. Drug or alcohol use was often involved.

Researchers have long known that sexual jealousy played a general role in abuse, but this is the first time it was shown that it was a specific form of jealousy — infidelity concerns — that tended to initiate the violence, said Julianna Nemeth, lead author of the study and a doctoral student in public health at Ohio State University.

"What we were looking for was the immediate precursor — what was the one thing that happened right before the violence that was the catalyst," Nemeth said.

"I have worked in domestic violence intervention for many years, but still the findings shocked me. We never knew that it was the accusation of infidelity that tended to trigger the violence."

Full story of domestic abusers at Science Daily

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