How are Dexedrine and Adderall different?

Dexedrine and Adderall are brand names for two of the most widely prescribed stimulant medications used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, commonly known as ADHD.

The medications share a similar set of possible side effects, risks, and warnings. But there are some small differences between Adderall and Dexedrine that may make one more suitable for some people than others.

Similarities and differences

Dexedrine and Adderall both contain forms of the synthetic compound amphetamine, which is a central nervous stimulant.

Full story at Medical News Today

Survey Finds 29% of College Students Think ADHD Drugs Help School Performance

A survey of college students finds 29 percent mistakenly think drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increase school performance.

An additional 38 percent are unsure of the drugs’ effects on school performance, HealthDay reports.

There is no evidence that stimulant medications such as Ritalin and Adderall are effective study aids, the article notes. The survey included almost 7,300 students, none of whom had been diagnosed with ADHD.

Full story at drugfree.org

Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants Provides No Academic Benefits: Study

A new study adds to the growing body of research indicating that nonmedical use of prescription stimulants for students without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely provides no academic benefits.

Many students use prescription ADHD drugs such as Ritalin or Adderall in response to academic difficulties, thinking these drugs will help them improve their grades, according to the researchers from the College Life Study at the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Full story of ADHD drugs and academic benefits study at drugfree.org

Professional Gamers Who Use Adderall Will Need Doctor’s Note

People who play electronic games professionally will not be allowed to use the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug Adderall unless they have a doctor’s note, the Electronic Sports League (ESL) said Wednesday.

The league announced the full list of drugs that will be banned for gaming competitions, including steroids and cocaine, Time reports.

“As the world’s largest and oldest esports organization, ESL has an ongoing commitment to safeguarding both the integrity of our competitions and that of esports as a whole—we wish to ensure we can provide a fair playing field for all participating players,” Ella McConnell, Senior Editor of ESLGaming, wrote in a statement.

Full story of professional gamers and Adderall at drugfree.org

Drug Maker Will Study ADHD Medication in Preschool Children

The manufacturer of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug Vyvanse has agreed to study the drug in preschool children, at the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The company, Shire, also makes the ADHD drug Adderall, the only such drug approved to treat children under age 6 in the United States.

A government study published last month found more than 10,000 toddlers in the United States are receiving medication for ADHD outside established guidelines. The report found children covered by Medicaid are most likely to receive drugs such as Ritalin or Adderall.

Full story of ADHD medication in children at drugfree.org