Personalized Feedback Can Help Reduce College Freshman Drinking

A program that provides college freshmen with personalized feedback on their drinking patterns can be effective in reducing their drinking, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Brown University reviewed studies of 62 programs designed to reducing drinking among college freshmen, which included more than 24,000 freshmen from around the country.

They concluded colleges should screen all freshmen within their first few weeks of school for alcohol risk, and offer interventions for those who said they drink, UPI reports. The program that provided the broadest benefits gave students a personalized feedback report, which included information such as how students’ own drinking compared with that of their peers, the costs of alcohol consumed, number of calories consumed, and blood alcohol levels. Students who had this information significantly reduced how much and how often they drank, the study found.

Full story of college drinking reduction at drugfree.org

NIDA Releases New Guide on Treating Teen Substance Abuse

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is releasing new resources to help parents, health care providers and substance abuse treatment specialists treat teens who are struggling with drug abuse. The resources also provide advice on identifying and interacting with teens who may be at risk.

The resources are being released in advance of National Drug Facts Week, January 27 to February 2, when communities and schools around the country will host events to allow teens to learn how drugs affect the brain, body and behavior.

Full story of new guide at drugfree.org

QUANTUM UNITS EDUCATION: New CEU Courses

New! HIV and Drugs of Abuse Revised

CE Course Description
This short CE Course is based on an updated research report by NIDA that highlights the state of the science between HIV and drug abuse.

New! HIV Update and Special Populations

CE Course Description
This short CE course on HIV and Special Populations is an update from the Center for Disease Control and addresses new data related to special populations in the United States.

New! Diagnoses and Health Care of Children in Foster Care and Covered by Medicaid

CE Course Description
This course was developed from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration informational and Truven Health Analytics report which presents (1) the prevalence of mental and physical illnesses and (2) the utilization of health care services among children in foster care (FC) who are covered by Medicaid.  Disparities between the children in FC and children covered by Medicaid who are not in FC are also identified.

New! Use of Benzodiazepines in the Treatment of PTSD

CE Course Description
This short course is an update by the National Center for PTSD/VA Medical Center on current recommendations regarding benzodiazepine use in PTSD treatment.

Homestudy: The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction

Course Description
This course was developed from the book, The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction: A Guide to Coping with the Grief, Stress, and Anger that Trigger Addictive Behavior by Rebecca E. Williams, PhD, and Julie Kraft, MA. It is designed to provide strategies for long tem wellness and recovery for those who have faced addiction, including getting to know thoughts, feelings, and behavior patterns and finding a path toward self-acceptance, transformation, and healing. The course outlines mindfulness practices that will benefit those in recovery as well as the professionals who work with them.

For more information on these courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

 

More students think marijuana is OK

Most teens may be “Above the Influence” when it comes to cocaine and cigarettes, but marijuana use is growing among students.

Sixty percent of U.S. high school seniors do not see regular marijuana use as harmful to their health, according to this year’s Monitoring the Future survey from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. More than a third of the seniors surveyed reported smoking marijuana in the past 12 months.

Each year, the Monitoring the Future survey asks eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders about their drug and alcohol use and their attitudes toward illegal substances. For 2013, more than 41,000 students from 389 U.S. public and private schools participated.

Only 2.4% of high school seniors reported using marijuana daily in 1993; this year that percentage nearly tripled  to 6.5 %. And it’s not just the older students  more than 12% of the eighth-graders surveyed said they had used marijuana.

“It is important to remember that over the past two decades, levels of THC  the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana  have gone up a great deal,” said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in a statement. “Daily use today can have stronger effects on a developing teen brain than it did 10 or 20 years ago. … The children whose experimentation leads to regular use are setting themselves up for declines in IQ and diminished ability for success in life.”

Full story of teens being okay with marijuana at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Smokers Addicted to Stimulants Can Quit Smoking Without Impacting Treatment

A new study finds smokers who are addicted to methamphetamine or cocaine can stop smoking while they are being treated for their addiction to stimulants, without adversely impacting their addiction treatment.

A previous government study found 63 percent of people with a substance use disorder in the past year also reported current tobacco use. While tobacco use causes more deaths among patients in substance abuse treatment than the substance that brought them to treatment, most substance treatment programs do not address smoking cessation, according to the National Institutes of Health.

“Substance abuse treatment programs have historically been hesitant to incorporate concurrent smoking cessation therapies with standard drug addiction treatment because of the concern that patients would drop out of treatment entirely,” Dr. Nora D. Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, said in a news release. “However, treating their tobacco addiction may not only reduce the negative health consequences associated with smoking, but could also potentially improve substance use disorder treatment outcomes.”

Full story of stimulates and smoking treatment at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education