Childhood psychiatric disorders increase risk for later adult addiction

Children’s health and well-being while growing up can be indicators of the potential health issues they may encounter years later. A study published in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry(JAACAP) suggests that a childhood psychiatric disorder increases the risk of developing addiction later in life. Based on a large amount of data from previous studies on these participants, the researchers identified a correlation between various psychiatric disorders among children and later risk of developing addictions.

The team, led by researchers from the Child Study group at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and Accare, the Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands, found that individuals diagnosed in childhood with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)/conduct disorder (CD), and depression had an increased risk of developing addictions. Interestingly, results concerning anxiety were less clear. The risk may depend on the specific type of anxiety disorder, but to date, no studies have focused on this topic.

Full story of childhood psychiatric disorders and adult addiction at Science Daily

Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants Provides No Academic Benefits: Study

A new study adds to the growing body of research indicating that nonmedical use of prescription stimulants for students without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely provides no academic benefits.

Many students use prescription ADHD drugs such as Ritalin or Adderall in response to academic difficulties, thinking these drugs will help them improve their grades, according to the researchers from the College Life Study at the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Full story of ADHD drugs and academic benefits study at drugfree.org

ADHD Medications Don’t Appear to Help Children With Homework: Study

Giving children stimulant medication meant to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has no significant effect on homework completion or accuracy, a new small study suggests.

The study, published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, included 75 children with ADHD who were attending a summer school program. The children received either behavioral treatment with daily report cards and parent coaching, or a long-acting stimulant, Reuters reports.

Full story of ADHD and children’s homework studies at drugfree.org

ADHD Treatment Linked to Lower Risk of Substance Use Disorder: Study

Children and teens who are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and take medication for the condition are less likely to have a substance use disorder than youth with ADHD who don’t take medication, a new study finds.

Researchers at Princeton University found children and teens with ADHD who received medication were 7.3 percent less likely to have a substance use disorder. They also were 3.6 percent less likely to contract a sexually transmitted disease and 2.3 percent less likely to be injured, HealthDay reports.

Full story of ADHD treatment and substance abuse disorder at drugfree.org

ADHD Treatment Linked to Lower Risk of Substance Use Disorder: Study

Children and teens who are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and take medication for the condition are less likely to have a substance use disorder than youth with ADHD who don’t take medication, a new study finds. Researchers at Princeton University found children and teens with ADHD who received medication were 7.3 percent less likely to have a substance use disorder. They also were 3.6 percent less likely to contract a sexually transmitted disease and 2.3 percent less likely to be injured, HealthDay reports. The findings are published in Labour Economics. Study co-author Anna Chorniy said young people with ADHD tend to have problems with self control, which can lead to injury and engaging in risky behaviors.

Full story of ADHD treatment and substance abuse disorder at drugfree.org