Targeting one gut bacterium may treat alcoholic liver disease

Precision targeting of bacteria in a different way to antibiotics shows promise as a treatment for alcoholic liver disease, according to new research in mice.

A recent Nature study paper describes how an international team of scientists used bacteriophages, which are viruses that kill bacteria, to eradicate alcoholic liver disease in mice.

They used a particular mixture of phages to selectively eliminate Enterococcus faecalis, a gut bacterium that releases a toxin that kills liver cells.

They found that people with alcoholic liver disease had more E. faecalis in their guts than people without this condition.

Full story at Medical News Today

Why does my face go red after drinking alcohol?

Some people develop a distinctive facial flush after drinking alcohol, when their face turns either slightly or very red. Why does this happen, and what does it mean?

This side effect of drinking alcohol is more common in people of East Asian descent. Although it does not cause immediate health problems, it may signal an increased risk of some serious health issues, such as high blood pressure and certain types of cancer.

In this article, we look at why some people experience facial flushing from alcohol, while others do not. We also look at the risks of this side effect and how to prevent it.

Full story at Medical News Today

Deaths Due to Alcohol, Drugs and Suicide Have Soared Among Young Adults

Deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide have soared among young adults ages 18 to 34, according to a new analysis.

The number of drug deaths among young adults has risen by 400% in the past two decades, according to the non-profit Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust. These deaths were fueled in large part by the opioid crisis, USA Today reports.

Alcohol-related deaths for young adults rose 68% between 2007 and 2017, while suicide deaths increased 35%. Rates for “deaths of despair” from alcohol, drugs and suicide were higher among young adults than among Baby Boomers and senior citizens.

Full story at drugfree.org

Why might smoking and drinking alcohol raise the risk of osteoporosis?

Recent research has uncovered a cell mechanism that could help explain why smoking, alcohol, and other modifiable factors could raise the risk of developing the bone disease osteoporosis.

The mechanism spurs a cell type in the immune system to turn into osteoclasts, which are a type of cell that resorbs, or dissolves, bone.

It appears that mitochondria, the tiny enclosures that produce energy in cells, send out a signal that triggers this process when under stress.

When this happens in the mitochondria of macrophages, the cells turn into osteoclasts. Macrophages are prolific immune cells that remove cell waste and foreign objects by swallowing and digesting them.

Full story at Medical News Today

Can you drink alcohol with antibiotics?

Many people believe that mixing alcohol and antibiotics is not safe. Is it dangerous? What are the risks of drinking alcohol while taking antibiotics?

Antibiotics are drugs that target bacteria to treat and prevent infections. There are many types of oral antibiotic.

Not all antibiotics interact with alcohol, and doctors give different recommendations about alcohol depending on the type of antibiotic.

In this article, we discuss the risks of mixing antibiotics and alcohol. We also explore the effects of alcohol on the immune system.

Full story at Medical News Today