Is just not drinking or drugging enough? | MENTAL HEALTH

By Vikki Adams

Stop Drinking & DruggingWhen substance abuse touches many families, the family just “wants it to stop,” but is that really enough?

Depending on how much and how often an individual has been using drugs and alcohol (including the perceived legal ones such as over-the-counter or prescription drugs, Herbal Incense, K-2 and bath salts), discontinuing use may not be as easy as it seems.

Post Acute Withdrawal may occur if the individual had slipped into dependency, which may result in a myriad of symptoms including problems with sleep, irritability, loss of memory, loss of concentration. It can possibly create physical repercussions such as seizures or feeling that you have had the worst flu in your life. These symptoms can sometimes last for weeks or even months.

If the individual was using as a way to cope with emotions or stressful situations, they will now be facing the same situations with no substance to “dull the pain.” Oftentimes the situation they were dealing with has worsened due to their drug or alcohol use and lack of attention.

Full story at Evansville Courier & Press

Tips for staying sober during the holidays

By Liz Barnes

Staying Sober For HolidaysMany a well-intended sober person has slipped or flat-out relapsed in this tricky holiday season.

It’s important to have a plan to steer you through these slippery times. It’s also important to be realistic and not attend drinking or using parties. I mean, come on now, do you really have any business being there? And really, do you think they will actually miss you? Didn’t think so.

During past holidays, stress, anxiety, loneliness, depression and worries disappeared in a flash by rubbing alcohol right across the tongue, then down to the tummy. Cocaine, pot and most any opiate also worked wonders on such terrible feelings.

So the plan needs to deal with these highly uncomfortable feelings. Let your loved ones in on your plan so they can help. It’s been said addiction is a feelings disease. Addicts hate to feel emotional and psychic pain more than most. Maybe, truth be told, they are just more sensitive to feelings. Who knows?

Full story at Auburn Pub

Would you take an anti-booze pill to stay sober?

By Jessica Laurence

Anti-Booze PillIf you’ve ever had a hangover so horrible that you vowed never to get drunk again, help could be on its way in pill form.

Scientists at the University of Adelaide are carrying out tests on a newly-developed drug which could prevent drinkers from getting drunk and wanting to drink more.

In trials, when mice were given enough alcohol to make them show signs of intoxication, the ones taking the medication remained sober.

Full story at AOL

Parents need to consider the facts when allowing teens to drink alcohol at home

By Youth Resources

Teen Drinking at HomeWhile relaxing on the beach during a family vacation this past summer, I was reading through a magazine when an article caught my attention both as a youth worker and as a mother.

The article shared the two major differing opinions on the age-old debate of whether parents should let their teenagers drink alcohol at home.

One mother expressed her opinion that she knows her teenager is going to drink alcohol when he is out with his friends anyway so she would rather them drink at her house where she knows they are safe.

Another mother shared her belief that she would not allow her daughter and her friends to drink at their home, because she does not want to send the message that it is OK to drink alcohol while she is under the legal age.

Full story at Courier Press

Booze a Bad Mix With Poor Impulse Control

By Michael Smith


Alcohol and impulsivity can be a toxic mix, researchers reported.

In a long-running, prospective cohort study among people seeking help for alcohol-related problems, those with poor impulse control had an increased risk of dying, according to Daniel Blonigen, PhD, and colleagues at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Palo Alto, Calif.

The effect was independent of the risk associated with alcohol use disorders, Blonigen and colleagues reported online in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Both impulsivity and alcohol use disorders are known to increase the risk of premature death, the researchers noted, and alcohol use increases impulsive behavior. But there has been no research on how poor impulse control affects mortality risk among people who also have problems with alcohol, they added.

Full story at Med Page Today