Alcohol Could Intensify Effects of Some Drugs in the Body

Alcohol Intensifies Effects of Some DrugsScientists are reporting another reason — besides possible liver damage, stomach bleeding and other side effects — to avoid drinking alcohol while taking certain medicines. Their report in ACS’ journal Molecular Pharmaceutics describes laboratory experiments in which alcohol made several medications up to three times more available to the body, effectively tripling the original dose.

Christel Bergström and colleagues explain that beverage alcohol, or ethanol, can cause an increase in the amount of non-prescription and prescription drugs that are "available" to the body after taking a specific dose. Alcohol can change how enzymes and other substances in the body interact with many of the 5,000 such medications on the market. Some of these medications don’t dissolve well in the gastrointestinal tract — especially in the stomach and intestines. The researchers sought to test whether ethanol made these drugs dissolve more easily. If so, this would make the drugs more available in the body, possibly intensifying their effects when combined with alcohol.

Full story of alcohol and drugs at Science Daily

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New Studies Shed Much-Needed Light on Alcohol-Induced Memory Blackouts

Memory Induced Black OutsNational survey studies suggest that roughly one in four college students who drink will experience a blackout in a given year, making blackouts a surprisingly common outcome of excessive drinking.

Blackouts are periods of amnesia, caused by excessive consumption of alcohol, during which a person actively engages in behaviors but the brain is unable to create memories for what transpires. This leaves holes in a person’s memory that can range from spotty recall for the events of the previous night (known as fragmentary blackouts) to the utter absence of memory for large portions of an evening (known as en bloc blackouts).

Blackouts are very different from passing out, when a person falls asleep or is rendered unconscious from drinking too much. During blackouts, people can participate in events ranging from the mundane, like eating food, to the emotionally charged, like fights or intercourse, with little or no recall. According to Dr. Aaron White, Program Director for Underage and College Drinking Prevention Research at the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), “It can be quite difficult for an outside observer to tell if someone is in a blackout. The person could seem aware and articulate, but without any memory being recorded.”

Full story of alcohol blackouts at DrugFree.org

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Quantum Units Education: New Online CEUs

179299_10150385872490363_346167810362_16956497_1031291_nEating Disorders Basic Overview
1 CEU Hours: $3.00
This guide is published by the National Institute of Mental Health. It provides a very basic overview of what eating disorders are and what can be done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines
15 CEU Hours: $45.00
This manual was put together by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and provides an in depth look at current treatment guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth
4 CEU Hours: $12.00
This Guide to help you conduct fast, effective alcohol screens and interventions with your patients, even during brief, acute care visits. The tools, tips, and resources are designed to help you surmount common obstacles to youth alcohol screening in primary care. Typical barriers include insufficient time, unfamiliarity with screening tools, the need to triage competing problems, and uncertainty about how to manage a positive screen (Van Hook et al., 2007).

Full information of new courses at Quantum Units Education

FTC Requires Major Alcohol Producers to Release Online Marketing Information

Major Alcohol Producers To Release Marketing InformationThe Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is requiring 14 major alcoholic beverage producers to provide information about their online marketing. The FTC will use the information for a study that will guide recommendations on how the alcohol industry should regulate itself, both online and offline.

The last time the FTC completed an alcohol marketing study was in 2008, using data from 2005, according to The Kansas City Star. That study found only 1.9 percent of alcohol marketing expenditures went toward Internet efforts.

The marketing landscape has changed dramatically since then, with a much greater emphasis on social media. For example, Bacardi has at least seven Facebook pages, with a total of 1.7 million fans, according to David Jernigan, Director of the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health. He notes that Captain Morgan Rum has a video game app for iPhones. Many companies connect with consumers through Twitter.

Full story of alcohol producers releasing marketing information at DrugFree.org

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Five secret truths about alcoholics and addicts

Auburn Pub

Secrets About Alcoholics and AddictsYou’d be surprised at the secrets addicts and alcoholics keep. Some are hard to comprehend, others downright dangerous. Here are five of the most common ones:

Addicts and alcoholics are profoundly ashamed.

Ashamed of what they have done. Ashamed of what they have neglected to do. They can’t believe they sat there in that bar, crack house or heroin den all night when they should have been at their kid’s birthday party. Hell, there isn’t even money left to buy a present. No one judges the addict as severely as they themselves do. They remember the lying, cheating and stealing. Many live with the shame of having sold their body and soul to all comers for one more hit. Total strangers. Unwashed. Unbelievable. Remembering all this can actually be a good thing. Because who wants to return to such a miserable existence? Both treatment and the 12 steps help deal with shame that, if left unattended, can drive a relapse. Sure, I’ve had plenty of clients with nary a drop of shame. They are the ones who really worry me. They come into treatment, do their time and leave unchanged. A little shame can be a good thing. It speaks volumes about morals and values.

They’re in recovery.

Full story at Auburn Pub