How I Stopped Drowning in Drink (VIDEO)

By Paul Carr

How To Stop DrinkingFor years I’d told myself I wasn’t an alcoholic. I never drank alone. I didn’t wake up with fierce cravings, and sometimes I went for one or two days without drinking. A need to drink all day, every day, was never my problem.

My problem was that once I had a drink—whether it was at 7 p.m. or 9 a.m.—I couldn’t stop until my body shut down and I passed out in a pile on the floor. I still had plenty of friends and still managed to hold down a job, but my relationship with alcohol was very obviously different from most people’s. I was an alcoholic.

As of Saturday, the counter on my website says "878 days." Eight hundred seventy-eight days since I had my last alcoholic drink. Eight hundred seventy-eight days since I declared—very publicly—that my drinking had passed the point where it was funny, crazy or even merely dangerous. In fact, my addiction to alcohol had reached a stage where it was highly likely to kill me.

Enough was enough. So I decided to quit. But I didn’t do it in the typical way.

Full story of a alcoholic’s life at The Wall Street Journal

LSD Might Help Alcoholics Quit, Stay Abstinent: Study

Health Day

LSD Helps Alcoholics QuitThe hallucinogenic drug LSD may help treat alcoholism, new research suggests.

A number of studies examining the use of LSD to treat a variety of disorders, including alcoholism, were conducted in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s.

In a new analysis, Norwegian researchers examined six studies of LSD and alcoholism that were conducted in the United States and Canada between 1966 and 1970.

The analysis of data from the 536 patients in the studies showed that a single dose of LSD helped heavy alcoholics quit and reduced their risk of resuming drinking, according to the meta-analysis appearing online March 8 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Patients who received a full dose of the controversial drug did the best. On average, 59 percent of those patients showed a clear improvement, compared with 38 percent of patients in other groups, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology researchers said.

Full story of lsd helping alcoholics at US News Health

Stop-Smoking Drug Makes Booze a Turnoff

By Dori F. Zaleznik, MD

Chantix Makes Booze a TurnoffVarenicline (Chantix), a drug that helps some smokers kick the habit could also reduce problem drinking by diminishing the pleasurable effects of alcohol, researchers suggested.

In a randomized, cross-over trial, dysphoric sensations after drinking an alcoholic beverage were greater when preceded by a dose of varenicline (Chantix) than placebo, reported Emma Childs, PhD, of the University of Chicago, and colleagues online inAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Alcohol-induced impairments in a measure of cognitive function also were less severe when participants took varenicline, the researchers indicated.

“This study, combined with previous evidence, suggests that varenicline may reduce alcohol drinking behaviors among light smokers by increasing the negative subjective effects of a low dose of alcohol, thus reducing the likelihood of a drinking episode becoming a binge,” Childs and colleagues concluded.

Full story at Med Page Today

Would you take an anti-booze pill to stay sober?

By Jessica Laurence

Anti-Booze PillIf you’ve ever had a hangover so horrible that you vowed never to get drunk again, help could be on its way in pill form.

Scientists at the University of Adelaide are carrying out tests on a newly-developed drug which could prevent drinkers from getting drunk and wanting to drink more.

In trials, when mice were given enough alcohol to make them show signs of intoxication, the ones taking the medication remained sober.

Full story at AOL

The Global Pain of Alcoholism

By Carole Bennett

alcoholismThrough the blogs I write about addiction and recovery I am fortunate to find many clients from all walks of life, all over the world. I encourage my clients to keep an ongoing journal about how they are feeling, what they are experiencing and how they are coping. Like all of us dealing with life on life’s terms, some weeks are naturally better than others, but living and loving an alcoholic/addict is sometimes a roller-coaster ride by the hour or day.

I have been counseling a woman in Monte Carlo for a few months. She was born into royalty and continues to live that lifestyle. With her permission, I have shared her current journal of confusion, anger, pain and suffering regarding her husband’s alcoholic condition. I disclose this for two reasons — it is moving, candid and a heart-rendering interpretation of her life with her loved one, and because this disease knows no boundaries as the family struggles regardless of what their bank account looks like.

In her own words (English is not her first language, so please keep that in mind), I have altered nothing other than the layout for easier reading. Meet a bold, empowered woman living the life of luxury from the outside, but tormented on the inside.

Full story at Huffington Post