Quantum Units Education: New CEUs

Children in Foster Care – Parents in Prison

This CEU course provides help with facilitating communication and cooperation between child welfare agencies and federal prisons so that parents can stay engaged in their children’s lives.  Explained in this course are common questions: social workers may have when managing cases of children with parents in federal prison; unit teams in federal prisons may have when working with incarcerated parents with children in foster care; and for those at residential reentry centers.  Also discussed is the incarceration process from arrest to release and the child welfare system’s process from initial report and the child’s placement in foster care to case planning and working towards a permanent solution.

Sexual Violence and Individuals Who Identify as LGBTQ

This CEU course provides information to state and community-based sexual violence prevention educators and practitioners on preventing sexual violence against individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ), by discussing background information, practical tips, and examples of existing LGBTQ-inclusive sexual violence prevention efforts and recommendations on how to design LGBTQ-specific prevention programming.

Hunger and Homelessness

This CEU course provides health care workers with information on hunger among the homeless, focusing on the following topics: the hunger-obesity paradox; undernutrition and its consequences; challenges faced by those with diabetes; living on food stamps; and examples of creative and sustainable ways currently being used to address these problems at a local level.

Optimal Living Space for People with Alzheimer’s Disease

This CEU course provides: the history of Alzheimer’s care facilities; a model of residential care; case studies; and design considerations for Alzheimer’s disease relating to way-finding and orientation, safety and security, entry and egress, bathing, secure outdoor spaces, private and quiet spaces, engaged wandering, and supporting family and professional caregiver involvement, among other aspects.

THRIVES – Prevention of Violence Against Children

This CEU course provides an overview of THRIVES and discusses the topics of: training in parenting; household economic strengthening; reduced violence through legal protection; improved services; values and norms that protect children; education and life skills; and surveillance and evaluation.

For more on these new ceus courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Federal Government Rarely Penalizes Nursing Homes for Overusing Antipsychotic Drugs

Although the federal government began a campaign in 2012 to get nursing homes to reduce their use of antipsychotic drugs, it rarely penalizes institutions that continue to use the drugs at high rates, NPR reports.

These drugs, designed to treat people with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, can be deadly for older people with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Despite this risk, almost 300,000 nursing home residents across the country are given antipsychotic medications, according to the article.

In Texas, more than one-quarter of nursing home residents are given antipsychotic drugs, compared with a nationwide average below 20 percent. The state has conducted a series of trainings for nursing home employees to teach them about alternatives to giving residents antipsychotic medications. Employees are encouraged to learn enough about residents to determine why they exhibit challenging behaviors, and to find ways to deal with these behaviors without antipsychotic drugs.

Full story of nursing homes and overuse of anti-psychotics at drugfree.org

Study: Vitamin E may help Alzheimer’s patients

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, nor is there an effective method of reversing symptoms such as memory loss, disorientation and difficulties in organizing thoughts. But a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests there may be some hope for improvement in these patients, in the form of vitamin E.

The study authors say that this is the first demonstration of vitamin E benefiting Alzheimer’s patients with mild to moderate disease. However, they caution that it doesn’t prove that the vitamin is always effective and therefore should not be universally recommended.

“This is a well done study by a solid research group,” said Maria Carrillo, vice president of Medical and Scientific Relations at the Alzheimer’s Association, in a statement. “The results are positive enough to warrant more research to replicate and confirm these findings, but should not change current medical practice. No one should take vitamin E for Alzheimer’s except under the supervision of a physician.”

Full story of vitamin E and Alzheimer’s patients at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

High Good, Low Bad Cholesterol Levels Are Healthy for Brain, Too

High levels of “good” cholesterol and low levels of “bad” cholesterol are correlated with lower levels of the amyloid plaque deposition in the brain that is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, in a pattern that mirrors the relationship between good and bad cholesterol in cardiovascular disease, UC Davis researchers have found.

“Our study shows that both higher levels of HDL — good — and lower levels of LDL — bad — cholesterol in the bloodstream are associated with lower levels of amyloid plaque deposits in the brain,” said Bruce Reed, lead study author and associate director of the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

The relationship between elevated cholesterol and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease has been known for some time, but the current study is the first to specifically link cholesterol to amyloid deposits in living human study participants, Reed said.

“Unhealthy patterns of cholesterol could be directly causing the higher levels of amyloid known to contribute to Alzheimer’s, in the same way that such patterns promote heart disease,” he said.

Full story of cholesterol levels and the brain at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Copper may be a trigger of Alzheimer’s disease

Copper, which is found in anything from drinking water to red meats, may be an environmental trigger of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.

The study, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests copper keeps toxic proteins from leaving the brain.

It is clear that, over time, copper impairs the systems through which amyloid beta is removed from the brain, said Rashid Deane, a research professor in the University of Rochester Medical Center  Department of Neurosurgery, member of the Center for Translational Neuromedicine, and lead author of the study.  This causes the protein “to accumulate in the brain and form the plaques that are the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.”

Copper is usually found in drinking water that is carried by copper pipes.  It is also found in shellfish, meats, nuts and many vegetables and fruits.  The mineral is important for the body because it helps with the development of the nervous system, along with bone growth and hormone secretion.

Researchers looked at the effect of copper-laced drinking water on mice. They used low doses of copper over a three-month period. The dose was 10% of the maximum contaminant level set by the Environment Protection Agency.

Full story of copper triggering Alzheimer’s disease at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education