Looking for links between Parkinson’s and bipolar disorder

A new systematic review and meta-analysis ask whether bipolar disorder is associated with developing Parkinson’s disease. Although the authors conclude that there is a link, it is a tough question to unpick.

Bipolar disorder (BD), which people once called manic depression, tends to begin around 20 years of age.

Characterized by cyclic episodes of depression and mania, BD affects an estimated 2.8% of adults in the United States each year.

Scientists do not know why BD occurs in some people but not others, although evidence suggests that the dopamine system might play a role.

Full story at Medical News Today

How does Zoloft affect bipolar disorder?

Zoloft is a type of medication that doctors call a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI. They may recommend it for mental health conditions, including certain types of bipolar disorder.

There are some side effects to consider before using this drug, however, and some may be cause for concern.

Anyone who is uncertain about their treatment should see a doctor, as there may be alternatives to Zoloft that they may wish to try.

Full story at Medical News Today

How are bipolar disorder and ADHD different?

Bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are two distinct health conditions. They share some similar symptoms but have several key differences.

ADHD is more common than bipolar disorder. As the two conditions can coexist, misdiagnosis can occur.

In this article, we compare bipolar disorder and ADHD. Read on to learn about the symptoms of each and how they can overlap. We also explain treatments and when to see a doctor.

Full story at Medical News Today

Is there a cure for bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a long-term mood disorder that may affect how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. Bipolar is not curable, but there are many treatments and strategies that a person can use to manage their symptoms.

Without treatment, bipolar disorder may cause unusual mood episodes. People with the condition may alternate between high periods, called manic episodes, and low periods, or depressive episodes.

During a manic episode, a person will often feel happy, have lots of energy, and be very sociable. During a depressive episode, they may feel sad, have low energy, and withdraw socially.

Full story at Medical News Today

Through my eyes: My bipolar journey

“She has blue eyes.” That was the first thing my dad said about me when I was born. He had blue eyes. It deeply saddens me to think that he was already looking for something that we had in common from the first moment he saw me.

All babies have blue eyes at birth, but mine turned hazel. As long as he lived, my dad never knew that we actually did have something in common. We both had bipolar disorder.

When I was a kid, my mom told me that my dad had “manic depression.” To me, that brought to mind a pot of boiling water with the lid vibrating and steam escaping, ready to explode at any moment.

Full story at Medical News Today