How are bipolar disorder and ADHD different?

Bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are two distinct health conditions. They share some similar symptoms but have several key differences.

ADHD is more common than bipolar disorder. As the two conditions can coexist, misdiagnosis can occur.

In this article, we compare bipolar disorder and ADHD. Read on to learn about the symptoms of each and how they can overlap. We also explain treatments and when to see a doctor.

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Is there a cure for bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a long-term mood disorder that may affect how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. Bipolar is not curable, but there are many treatments and strategies that a person can use to manage their symptoms.

Without treatment, bipolar disorder may cause unusual mood episodes. People with the condition may alternate between high periods, called manic episodes, and low periods, or depressive episodes.

During a manic episode, a person will often feel happy, have lots of energy, and be very sociable. During a depressive episode, they may feel sad, have low energy, and withdraw socially.

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Through my eyes: My bipolar journey

“She has blue eyes.” That was the first thing my dad said about me when I was born. He had blue eyes. It deeply saddens me to think that he was already looking for something that we had in common from the first moment he saw me.

All babies have blue eyes at birth, but mine turned hazel. As long as he lived, my dad never knew that we actually did have something in common. We both had bipolar disorder.

When I was a kid, my mom told me that my dad had “manic depression.” To me, that brought to mind a pot of boiling water with the lid vibrating and steam escaping, ready to explode at any moment.

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Bipolar disorder: A good diet may boost treatment

Diet quality can affect many aspects of one’s physical health and psychological well-being. New research investigates whether or not these factors can also affect the effectiveness of treatments for mood disorders — particularly bipolar.

The moods of people who have bipolar disorder fluctuate between two extremes.

These are the “highs,” during which the person feels euphoric and may engage in dangerous behaviors, and the “lows,” characterized by depression and lethargy.

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Teen marijuana use may lead to bipolar symptoms later on

It’s a well-known fact that many young people use cannabis, and studies have pointed to a link between the drug and psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia. However, the links between cannabis use and the development of bipolar symptoms over time have been insufficiently studied — until now.

A new study fills this research gap by examining how cannabis use among teenagers is linked with hypomania in early adulthood.

The research was led by Dr. Steven Marwaha, a clinical academic psychiatrist from the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, and the findings were published in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Full story at Medical News Today