Breast cancer: Cut down on alcohol to lower risk

New research involving Australian women aged 45 years and over found that the majority of this cohort believes that there is not a significant link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk. That could not be less true, the investigators warn.

The World Health Organization (WHO) note that breast cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer in women across the world.

Many factors can increase the risk of developing breast cancer, some of which are nonmodifiable — chiefly age and sex — and some of which a person can act upon, including a lack of physical activity or being overweight.

Full story at Medical News Today

Alcohol may improve breast cancer survival

Although drinking alcohol is known to be a risk factor for developing breast cancer, a new study suggests that alcohol may not have any effect on whether you survive the disease.  In fact, researchers found that being a moderate drinker may actually improve your chances of survival.

“The results of the study showed there was no adverse relationship between drinking patterns before diagnosis and breast cancer survival,” said Polly Newcomb, director of the cancer prevention program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and the lead author of the study.

“We actually found that relative to non-drinkers there were modestly improved survival rates for moderate alcohol intake.”

The researchers followed close to 25,000 breast cancer patients for an average of 11 years, and found that women who drank moderately – three to six drinks per week – before developing breast cancer were 15% less likely to die from the disease.

Full story of alcohol and breast cancer at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Alcohol may improve breast cancer survival

Although drinking alcohol is known to be a risk factor for developing breast cancer, a new study suggests that alcohol may not have any effect on whether you survive the disease.  In fact, researchers found that being a moderate drinker may actually improve your chances of survival.

“The results of the study showed there was no adverse relationship between drinking patterns before diagnosis and breast cancer survival,” said Polly Newcomb, director of the cancer prevention program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and the lead author of the study.

“We actually found that relative to non-drinkers there were modestly improved survival rates for moderate alcohol intake.”

The researchers followed close to 25,000 breast cancer patients for an average of 11 years, and found that women who drank moderately – three to six drinks per week – before developing breast cancer were 15% less likely to die from the disease.

Full story of alcohol and breast cancer at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Less housework + more technology = worse health, study says

Since the 1960s, women have been spending more and more time in formal work environments, which means less time at home, doing housework.

Thanks to technology, those who do stay home and choose to do household chores have a much easier time than women did in the ’60s. Combine this with the sedentary nature of many modern jobs, the free time that technology affords us and the prevalence of televisions, computers and tablets, and women’s health is negatively affected — and is affecting the health of their children — according to a recently released report.

“The premise of the study is that humans have engineered activity out of every domain of daily life … from the workplace to the home … but we are not suggesting that women should be doing more housework,” said Dr. Edward Archer, a research fellow with the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina in Columbia and lead author of the study.

Full story of housework and health at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education