Is it safe to use marijuana while breastfeeding?

Some women use marijuana to manage the side effects of pregnancy, to cope with anxiety, or to sleep better. Many also hope they can safely do so while breastfeeding.

According to 2017 research carried out on a group of pregnant women in California, about 7 percent of the women surveyed used marijuana. Research suggests that marijuana can get into breast milk, which means that it may not be safe to use while breastfeeding.

However, little research is available, and much of the research that does exist is incomplete, poorly designed, or very outdated. In this article, learn about whether it is safe to use marijuana while breastfeeding, as well as about the possible risks for the baby.

Full story at Medical News Today

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain

Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain.  This CEU course provides recommendations that address when to initiate or continue opioids for chronic pain, assesses risk and harm of opioid use, and opioid selection, dosage, duration, follow-up, and discontinuation.

Breastfeeding Basics: Benefits, Support, Tips, and Concerns

Breastfeeding helps to establish a secure and loving relationship between the mother and her infant and offers many other positive benefits.  This CEU course provides information on the benefits of breastfeeding, factors affecting the decision to initiate or continue breastfeeding, methods to support breastfeeding mothers, practical breastfeeding techniques and tips, planning for time away from the infant, common concerns, and use of cigarettes, alcohol, other drugs, and certain beverages while breastfeeding.

Management of HIV Infection in Prison Populations

This CEU course provides guidance on the screening, evaluation, and treatment of federal inmates with HIV infection, with a focus on primary care.

Preventing Suicide

Suicide is highly prevalent and presents a major challenge to public health in the United States and worldwide.  This CEU course provides strategies for preventing the risk of suicide in the first place as well as approaches to lessen the immediate and long-term harms of suicidal behavior for individuals, families, communities, and society.

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Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Human Trafficking Prevention

The global anti-trafficking movement is now well into its second decade.  This CEU course focuses on the positive developments and continued challenges of preventing trafficking, and it considers how governments and the broader anti-trafficking community can effectively ensure that those who are vulnerable to human trafficking have the tools and opportunities to avert the risks of exploitation.

Breastfeeding Overview

Although breastfeeding is a natural process, many moms need help.  This CEU course covers the importance of breastfeeding, along with learning how and common challenges of breastfeeding.

Antimicrobial Guidelines for Prison Populations

Antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem in the healthcare and community setting – leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.  This CEU course provides guidance on the appropriate use of antimicrobials, provides recommendations and standards for the medical management of inmates receiving antimicrobial therapy, and outlines the Federal Bureau of Prisons Antimicrobial Stewardship Program.

Suicide Prevention Protocols for Juvenile Justice Youth

Youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system, especially those in residential facilities, have higher rates of suicide than their non-system-involved peers.  This short CEU course provides guidance on developing and implementing comprehensive suicide prevention policies within juvenile correction facilities.

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Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Supporting Women with Substance Use Disorders in Co-ed Settings

Most women are served in co-ed settings, yet the design of behavioral health services rarely takes sex and gender differences into account.  This CE course provides principles and practices that co-ed centers can use to assess and improve their programs to better serve women.

Impacts of Sleep Loss and Stress

Sleep has been ascribed a critical role in cognitive functioning.  This advanced CEU course provides evidence linking sleep to mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity and synaptic scaling.  How disruption of sleep by acute and chronic stress may impair these mechanisms and degrade sleep function is also considered.

Breastfeeding: Influence on Socio-Emotional Development

Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) duration plays a prominent role in promoting healthy brain and cognitive development in human children.  This advanced CEU course examines whether and how the duration of EBF impacts the neural processing of emotional signals by measuring electro-cortical responses to body expressions in 8-month-old infants.

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Breastfeeding Possible Deterrent to Autism

In an article appearing in Medical Hypotheses on September 20, a New York-based physician-researcher from the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine has called for the testing of umbilical cord blood for levels of a growth protein that could help predict an infant’s propensity to later develop autism.

Based on an analysis of findings in prior published studies, Touro researcher Gary Steinman, MD, PhD, proposes that depressed levels of a protein called insulin-like growth factor (IGF) could potentially serve as a biomarker that could anticipate autism occurrence.

His research points to numerous prior studies that powerfully link IGF with a number of growth and neural functions. Dr. Steinman — who has also conducted extensive research into fertility and twinning — further points to breastfeeding as a relatively abundant source of the protein. He says that IGF delivered via breastfeeding would compensate for any inborn deficiency of the growth factor in newborns.

If the IGF-autism hypothesis is validated by further study, Dr. Steinman says, an increase in the duration of breastfeeding could come to be associated with a decreased incidence of autism.

Full story of breastfeeding and autism at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education