QUANTUM UNITS EDUCATION: New CEUs from our APA Approved Sponsor

NEW QUANTUM LOGOQuantum Units Education has an all new category of CEU Courses available. Courses are offered by our APA (American Psychological Association) approved Sponsor. These courses are also approved for many other licensed and certified professionals throughout the United States that were unable to take courses from Quantum in the past such as Marriage and Family Therapists, Social Workers and Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs). So be sure to check out our State CEU approvals page to find out if your state board accepts courses offered by an approved sponsor of the American Psychological Association. Certificates issued for these courses will bear the name of our APA approved sponsor TeachME Professional Development, a subsidiary owned by Quantum.

See Our all New APA Sponsor Approved CEUs – New courses will be added to this new category monthly so stay tuned!

Below is a list of the courses available under this category:

Bullying In Schools: An Overview

Childhood Exposure to Family Violence

Electronic Aggression and Cyber-Bullying

Ethics for Psychologists

Reactive Attachment Disorder

Research Trends in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Trauma-Focused CBT for Children Affected by Sexual Abuse or Trauma

For these courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Unattractive People More Likely to Be Bullied at Work

It’s common knowledge that high school can be a cruel environment where attractive students are considered “popular,” and unattractive kids often get bullied. While that type of petty behavior is expected to vanish with adulthood, new research proves it does not.

Colleagues can be just as immature as classmates.

The study by Timothy Judge, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, and Brent Scott from Michigan State University is the first to link attractiveness to cruelty in the workplace.

In “Beauty, Personality, and Affect as Antecedents of Counterproductive Work Behavior Receipt,” recently published in Human Performance, the researchers examine counterproductive work behavior and its effect on employees. They show that physical attractiveness plays as much of a role as personality in how a person is treated in the workplace.

The researchers surveyed 114 workers at a health care facility, asking them how often their co-workers treated them cruelly, including saying hurtful things, acting rudely and making fun of them. Through digital photos, the workers’ “attractiveness” was then judged by others who didn’t know them.

Full story of unattractive people getting bullied at work at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

5 things we learned about kids’ health this week

From cyber-bullying that could threaten your teen’s self-esteem, to dangerous distractions that could cause you to crash while driving your kids, here’s a look at five important studies about the health of children being presented this week at a large pediatric conference in Washington.

1. Moms and dads are distracted while driving kids

Researchers asked 600 parents what distractions they encountered while driving their most precious cargo: Their children. Among the interruptions: Talking on the phone, texting, surfing the Internet, checking a navigation system, and changing a CD or DVD.

Almost 90% of parents admitted to doing at least one of these technology-based distractions.
“These distracted drivers were more likely to have been in a crash,” noted the study’s lead author, Dr. Michelle Macy, a specialist in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Michigan’s  C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Full story of kids health at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Online or Off, Bullying Proves Harmful

Cyber Bullying Online or OffChildren who are bullied online or by mobile phone are just as likely to skip school or consider suicide as kids who are physically bullied, according to a study led by a Michigan State University criminologist.

The findings, published in the International Criminal Justice Review, suggest parents, school officials and policymakers should consider bullying experiences both on and offline when creating anti-bullying policies and procedures.

"We should not ignore one form of bullying for the sake of the other," said Thomas Holt, associate professor of criminal justice. "The results suggest we should find ways to develop school policies to combat bullying within the school environment and then figure out how to translate that to the home, because the risk goes beyond the schoolyard."

The study is one of two new research papers from MSU scholars dealing with cyberbullying. The other study, led by Saleem Alhabash in the Department of Advertising and Public Relations, suggests positive online comments are an effective way to fight cyberbullying.

Full story of online bullying at Science Daily

Photos courtesy of and copyright PhotoPin, http://photopin.com/

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

From Bullying to Relationships: Mapping Our Online Communications

Mapping our Online CommunicationsWhen we typically think of kids who are the victims of school bullying, what comes to mind are isolated youth who do not fit in. A new study, however, shows that when that harassment occurs online, the victims tend to be in mainstream social groups — and they are often friends or former friends, not strangers.

The research is part of a burgeoning field of study into the effects of social media on everyday relationships and behavior. Personality and social psychologists are finding surprising ways in which people’s online environments and relationships reflect and influence their real-world ones, as presented January 19 at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual meeting in New Orleans.

"Researchers have known for a while that individuals give unique cues about who they are with the things they own, clothes they wear, things they say and do. However, though these cues are informative to knowing who someone truly is, they were not always so easily accessible to our entire social network," says Lindsay Graham of the University of Texas, Austin, one of the presenters. "Now with much of our lives being lived online, and the boundaries having been blurred between who sees these cues and who doesn’t, it is all the more important to pay attention to the kinds of impressions we are giving off to those around us."

Full story of bullying to relationships at Science Daily

Photos courtesy of and copyright PhotoPin, http://photopin.com/

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education