Single Energy Drink Can Cause Potentially Harmful Spikes in Blood Pressure: Study

Consuming just one energy drink can cause blood pressure and stress hormone levels to spike, according to a study of young, healthy adults.

The study found young adults who consumed one 16-ounce can of Rockstar Punched experienced a 74 percent increase in blood levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine,HealthDay reports. That level is more than double an average 30 percent increase the participants experienced when they consumed a sham energy drink with the same amount of sugar, but without the natural stimulants found in Rockstar.

Stimulants in Rockstar include caffeine, taurine, guarana, ginseng and milk thistle extract.

Full story of energy drinks and harmful spikes in blood pressure at drugfree.org

Smokers Addicted to Stimulants Can Quit Smoking Without Impacting Treatment

A new study finds smokers who are addicted to methamphetamine or cocaine can stop smoking while they are being treated for their addiction to stimulants, without adversely impacting their addiction treatment.

A previous government study found 63 percent of people with a substance use disorder in the past year also reported current tobacco use. While tobacco use causes more deaths among patients in substance abuse treatment than the substance that brought them to treatment, most substance treatment programs do not address smoking cessation, according to the National Institutes of Health.

“Substance abuse treatment programs have historically been hesitant to incorporate concurrent smoking cessation therapies with standard drug addiction treatment because of the concern that patients would drop out of treatment entirely,” Dr. Nora D. Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, said in a news release. “However, treating their tobacco addiction may not only reduce the negative health consequences associated with smoking, but could also potentially improve substance use disorder treatment outcomes.”

Full story of stimulates and smoking treatment at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Can you OD on caffeine?

The rumor: It’s possible to get caffeine poisoning

As he was driving down an Ohio freeway minutes after swallowing five Magnum 357 caffeine pills, Christian Brenner started to vibrate — and the cars in his rearview mirror did as well. Fortunately, Brenner pulled over and walked around in an effort to try and come down.

Today, he swears off caffeine, even coffee — the mental aftereffect of what he says was straight-up caffeine poisoning.

The verdict: Yes, you can OD on caffeine. The trick is to know your body, pay attention to what else you’ve ingested and do your homework on energy drinks

Caffeine acts as a stimulant in humans. It can be found in the seeds, leaves and fruit of plants like coffee or kola nuts.

“Safe doses of caffeine are usually quoted at around 200 to 300 milligrams, or two to four cups of coffee per day,” says Dr. David Seres, associate professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University.

Full story of OD on caffeine at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Health Experts Ask FDA to Restrict Caffeine Content in Energy Drinks

A group of health experts is asking the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to restrict the amount of caffeine permitted in energy drinks, according to The New York Times.

Eighteen physicians, public health experts and researchers wrote a letter to the FDA on Tuesday, saying the move is needed to protect children and teenagers from the potential risks of consuming large quantities of caffeine.

“There is evidence in the published scientific literature that the caffeine levels in energy drinks pose serious potential health risks,” they wrote. “Younger individuals tend to have greater sensitivity to a given serving of caffeine than adults because they are more likely to have a lower body mass and are less likely have already developed a pharmacological tolerance from regular caffeine consumption.”

Full story of caffeine in energy drinks at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Study Finds Some Energy Drink Labels List Incorrect Caffeine Amount

Energy Drinks Listing Incorrect CaffeineMany energy drinks incorrectly list the amount of caffeine in their product, or do not list the amount at all, according to Consumer Reports.

The magazine tested 27 popular energy drinks and shots, and calculated the amount of caffeine in one serving, based on the manufacturer’s serving size, according to CBS News. Of those products, 16 listed specific caffeine amounts. Five products—Arizona Energy, Clif Shot Turbo Energy Gel, Nestle Jamba, Sambazon Organic Amazon Energy and Venom Energy—had 20 percent more caffeine per serving than stated on the label. Archer Farms Energy Drink had 70 percent less caffeine than indicated on the label. The caffeine levels of the remaining products fell within 20 percent of the amount stated on the label.

Monster Beverage Corp. told CBS News its company does not list caffeine amounts because “there is no legal or commercial business requirement to do so, and also because our products are completely safe, and the actual numbers are not meaningful to most consumers.”

Full story of energy drinks at DrugFree.org

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