Depression among young teens linked to cannabis use at 18

A study looking at the cumulative effects of depression in youth, found that young people with chronic or severe forms of depression were at elevated risk for developing a problem with cannabis in later adolescence.

The study led by UW Medicine researchers interviewed 521 students recruited from four Seattle public middle schools. Researchers used data from annual assessments when students were ages 12-15 and then again when they were 18. The results were published in the journal Addiction.

“The findings suggest that if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis use disorder,” said lead author Isaac Rhew, research assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Full story of depression among young teens related to cannabis at Science Daily

Brain Imaging Insight Into Cannabis as a Pain Killer

Cannabis as a Pain KillerThe pain relief offered by cannabis varies greatly between individuals, a brain imaging study carried out at the University of Oxford suggests.

The researchers found that an oral tablet of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, tended to make the experience of pain more bearable, rather than actually reduce the intensity of the pain.

MRI brain imaging showed reduced activity in key areas of the brain that substantiated the pain relief the study participants experienced.

‘We have revealed new information about the neural basis of cannabis-induced pain relief,’ says Dr Michael Lee of Oxford University’s Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB).

He adds: ‘Our small-scale study, in a controlled setting, involved 12 healthy men and only one of many compounds that can be derived from cannabis. That’s quite different from doing a study with patients. My view is the findings are of interest scientifically but it remains to see how they impact the debate about use of cannabis-based medicines. Understanding cannabis‘ effects on clinical outcomes, or the quality of life of those suffering chronic pain, would need research in patients over long time periods.’

Full story of cannabis as a pain killer at Science Daily

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Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education