Physical fitness may help prevent depression, anxiety

Although there is evidence that exercise can boost mental health, scientists know less about whether physical fitness can prevent the onset of mental health conditions. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis take a closer look.

Common mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety, are a growing global issue.

They reduce overall wellbeing and life satisfaction, but they may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and increase mortality risk.

Although talking therapies and medication can help in many instances, they do not help everyone.

Full story at Medical News Today

Marijuana may be risky for those with heart disease

Although marijuana may have some benefits, its use could cause health issues for older people with cardiovascular disease. One case, in particular, is sparking some questions.
In recent years, the legalization of marijuana has become more widespread.Some people use the drug recreationally, while some use it to relieve chronic pain and the impact of some mental health issues.
However, experts state that there needs to be more research into the effects of marijuana in older people.

Full story at Medical News Today

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Suicide Clusters in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents and young adults have alarmingly high suicide rates and are at greater risk for suicide contagion and cluster formation than other age demographics.  This CE course provides research on suicide clusters and contagion in general and within AI/AN communities, and includes discussions with several subject matter experts and interviews with representatives from the CDC and the Indian Health Service.

PTSD and Cardiovascular Disease

Though many cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention efforts have focused on reducing exposure to traditional risk factors, there is increasing recognition of the importance of psychological risk factors.  This CE course looks at how targeting PTSD and other psychological conditions could dramatically reduce the burden of CVD.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

E-cigarettes popular among smokers with existing illnesses

Current and former smokers suffering from illnesses like chronic lung or cardiovascular disease are more likely to use e-cigarettes, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

In the U.S. more than 16 million people with smoking-related illnesses continue to use cigarettes. According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, current and former smokers who suffer from disease are more likely to have reported using an e-cigarette, meaning these patients may see e-cigarettes as safer or less harmful than combustible cigarettes and a way to reduce the risks posed by traditional smoking.

Use of electronic cigarettes has significantly increased in recent years. In 2010, only 2% of American adults had ever used an e-cigarette, but by 2014, that number had jumped to 12.6%. While most people see e-cigarettes as a safer alternative to traditional combustible smoking, many questions remain unanswered about their effects.

Full story of e-cigarettes and smokers with existing illnesses at Science Daily