Insomnia: ‘Long-distance’ CBT as effective as in-person therapy

Thousands of people around the world experience insomnia, which affects their quality of life, health, and productivity. One effective way of managing insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy, but many individuals may not have the time or money to visit a therapist’s office. So, what is the solution?

Studies have shown that at least 10–30% of the world’s population, if not more, deal with insomnia, a sleep disorder in which people frequently have difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or getting good quality sleep.

Chronic insomnia can also increase a person’s sense of fatigue and their risk of experiencing poor mental health. People with insomnia also report having other health conditions more often than people who do not experience this sleep disturbance.

Full story at Medical News Today

Internet-based CBT effective for treating severe depression

New research finds that cognitive behavioral therapy sessions delivered via an app can effectively treat various forms of depression, including a severe form of the condition.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term form of therapy that helps change people’s thought patterns.

The technique can successfully treat depression, anxiety and panic disorder, bipolar, substance use disorders, and many other mental health conditions.

In recent decades, more and more studies have been pointing to the benefits of Internet-based CBT (iCBT) for depression.

How virtual reality may help to treat fear, paranoid thoughts

A new study has discovered that adding virtual reality cognitive behavioral therapy to the standard treatment for psychotic disorders is safe and can reduce paranoia and anxiety.’

In a paper published in The Lancet Psychiatry, the researchers state that to their knowledge, theirs is the first randomized controlled trial of virtual reality (VR)-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that has attempted to improve social functioning and decrease paranoid thoughts in people with psychotic disorders.

“The addition,” explains lead author Roos M. C. A. Pot-Kolder, from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in the Netherlands, “of virtual reality CBT to standard treatment reduced paranoid feelings, anxiety, and use of safety behaviors in social situations, compared with standard treatment alone.”

Full story at Medical News Today