Exercise Plus Counseling May Help Treat People Addicted to Methamphetamine: Study

People addicted to methamphetamine may be helped by exercise along with addiction counseling, a new small study suggests. The researchers report exercise increased the number of dopamine receptors in the brain, which can lower the desire for the drug.

Using methamphetamine causes a release of dopamine, a substance in the brain that provides sensations of pleasure and satisfaction. It also causes methamphetamine’s high. Repeated meth use causes the number of dopamine receptors to decrease.

As a person recovers from meth addiction, the number of dopamine receptors increase over time, but the recovery rate varies widely. Other studies have suggested chronic use of meth can cause long-term problems in brain function that can affect a person’s self-control and judgment, the researchers said.

Full story exercise and counseling to treat meth addiction at drugfree.org

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress – An Applied Developmental Perspective

There are seven key principles that summarize the understanding of self-regulation development.  This CEU course provides a comprehensive framework for understanding those key principles of self-regulation in context, using a theoretical model that reflects the influence of biology, caregiving, and the environment on the development of self-regulation.  Consideration of how stress and adversity may impact self-regulation, along with the developmental tasks of self-regulation from birth through young adulthood, with particular attention to contextual factors that may impact development are also discussed.

Legal Protection for Older Adults During All-Hazards Emergencies

The guidance offered in this course is intended to help close many of the gaps in emergency planning and preparedness for vulnerable older adults.  In particular, this CEU course seeks to give public health officials, the Aging Services Network, emergency management personnel, and essential partners from other sectors and at all jurisdiction levels the critical information, strategies, and resources they need to improve the planning for and protection of vulnerable, community-dwelling older adults during all types of emergencies.

Competencies for Counseling the Multiracial Population

The goal of this CEU course is for the competencies discussed to serve as a resource and provide a framework for how counseling and other helping professionals can competently and effectively work with and advocate for members of the multiracial population, including interracial couples, multiracial families, multiracial individuals, and transracial adoptees and families.

The Problem of Prescription Drug Use in the United States

This CEU course sets out to improve the understanding of current prescription drug abuse activities and analyze a report which provides a review of current initiatives and identifies opportunities to ensure the safe use of prescription drugs with the potential for abuse and the treatment of prescription drug dependence.

For more information on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

 

Some Strategies to Protect College Students Against Drinking Too Much May Backfire

Some strategies college students use to help protect them against drinking too much may backfire, a new study suggests. Some of these strategies are associated with greater alcohol use and an increased number of consequences, the researchers tell Reuters.

Protective strategies can include making sure you go home with a friend, having a friend let you know when you’ve had enough to drink, avoiding drinking games or drinking water between alcoholic drinks.

The findings come from a study of almost 700 undergraduate college students, and 131 of their friends, who intended to go on a spring break trip and drink heavily on at least one day. They answered an online survey before and after the trip about drinking activities, protective strategies and negative consequences of drinking, such as fighting, passing out, or taking foolish risks.

Full story of protecting college students against drinking at drugfree.org

Substance Abuse Treatment Counselors Say Workplace Violence is Common

Counselors at substance use disorder treatment programs say violence against them is common, a new study finds. More than half said they personally experienced violence, 44 percent witnessed violence, and 61 percent had knowledge of violence directed at a colleague.

The study is the first to measure the extent of workplace violence in treatment programs across the United States, according to News-Medical.net.

“We know that workplace violence disproportionately impacts health care and social service providers,” lead author Brian E. Bride of George State University said in a news release. “Our goal was to quantify its existence in substance abuse treatment centers, identify personal and institutional responses, and identify any characteristics that may put counselors at greater risk.”

Full story of workplace violence and substance abuse at drugfree.org

Not Enough Evidence to Give Doctors Advice on Reducing Teens’ Drug Use: Expert Panel

A government panel said this week there is insufficient evidence about the best way for doctors to persuade children and teens not to use drugs.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which issues guidelines for doctors, said they did not find enough reliable studies to base recommendations on, NPR reports. They reviewed studies on brief counseling sessions during an office visit, which is sometimes combined with computer-based screening. They also looked at studies of computer-based programs that children or teens access at home.

Full story on the drug expert panel at drugfree.org