Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Supporting Service Providers in Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect

Focusing on protective factors is critical and sorely needed for the prevention of child maltreatment and promotion of child and family well-being.  This CEU course provides information to help service providers and others concerned about the health and well-being of children to understand child abuse and neglect, its effects, and what each person can do to address it when it occurs.

Environmental Design for People with Dementia Nearing End of Life

The design of environments in which people with dementia live should be understandable, reinforce personal identity, and maintain their ability.  This CEU course explores the view of people with dementia, family carers, and professionals on what aspects of the physical environment would be important to support good quality of life to the very end.

Promoting Best Practice and Safety Through Preprinted Physician Orders

This CEU course explores the potential of preprinted physician orders to improve interdisciplinary integration in care, promote accurate communication, and reduce variation by combining pertinent reminders, safety alerts, and “best practice” into a just-in-time process.

LGBTQ Youth, YMSM and YWSW Who Engage in Survival Sex

This CEU course describes and quantifies the sexual and physical health outcomes among LGBTQ youth, YMSM, and YWSW engaged in survival sex; assesses how many are using and abusing alcohol and drugs; and details youths’ access to and interactions with treatment and service providers.

Principles of Substance Abuse Prevention for Early Childhood

While substance use generally begins during the adolescent years, there are known biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors that contribute to the risks that begin accumulating as early as the prenatal period.  This CEU course provides the specific ways in which early interventions can have positive effects on development and gives an overview of child development from the prenatal period through age 8, along with the factors that either place a child at risk for later substance use or offer protection against that risk.

For more information on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Fewer Nursing Home Residents Taking Antipsychotic Drugs, Report Finds

Fewer long-term nursing home residents are taking antipsychotic medications, compared with 2011, according to a new government report. The decrease came after a campaign that targeted overprescribing, according to The Hill.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services report found 18.7 percent of long-stay nursing home residents received an antipsychotic medication in the first quarter of 2015, compared with 23.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2011.

In March, a report by the Government Accountability Office found evidence of widespread overuse of antipsychotic drugs by the elderly with dementia. The report called on Medicare to take immediate steps to reduce unnecessary prescriptions.

Full story of nursing homes taking antipsychotic drugs at drugfree.org

Depression in dementia more common in community care, study finds

A University of Manchester study of over 400 people in eight EU countries with severe dementia has found that those residing in long-term care homes are less likely to suffer from depressive symptoms than those living in the community.

Researchers studied 414 people with severe dementia along with their carers in England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. The study gathered information on quality of life, activities of daily living such as bathing, feeding and dressing and presence of depressive symptoms using standardised measures.

In the groups studied, 37% of the 217 people living in the community showed signs of depression compared to 23% of the 197 in care homes. It is one of the few studies comparing similar groups of people living at home and in nursing homes.

Full story of depression in dementia at Science Daily

Federal Government Rarely Penalizes Nursing Homes for Overusing Antipsychotic Drugs

Although the federal government began a campaign in 2012 to get nursing homes to reduce their use of antipsychotic drugs, it rarely penalizes institutions that continue to use the drugs at high rates, NPR reports.

These drugs, designed to treat people with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, can be deadly for older people with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Despite this risk, almost 300,000 nursing home residents across the country are given antipsychotic medications, according to the article.

In Texas, more than one-quarter of nursing home residents are given antipsychotic drugs, compared with a nationwide average below 20 percent. The state has conducted a series of trainings for nursing home employees to teach them about alternatives to giving residents antipsychotic medications. Employees are encouraged to learn enough about residents to determine why they exhibit challenging behaviors, and to find ways to deal with these behaviors without antipsychotic drugs.

Full story of nursing homes and overuse of anti-psychotics at drugfree.org

Resisting temptation: It’s all in your brain

If I offer you a bag of potato chips today or a box of chocolate truffles next week, which would you choose? Neuroscientists are interested in exploring what happens when the brain must choose between receiving a reward immediately or in the future, especially when waiting may result in a prize you like better.

A seahorse-shaped structure in the brain called the hippocampus is involved in recalling events from the past, and imagining them in the future. A new study in the journal PLOS Biology explores what role the hippocampus plays when a person has to decide between getting a reward now or later.

This study looked at healthy individuals as well as those with Alzheimer’s disease, a condition characterized by memory impairment and associated with atrophy of the hippocampus, and a different brain condition called frontotemporal dementia.

The French study, led by Mael Lebreton at the Brain and Spine Institute (ICM) in Paris, looked at time-dependent choices involving money, as well as “episodic” options such as food, sports or cultural events.

In the first experiment, researchers gave 15 participants a series of decisions about choosing one reward or another, where one of the hypothetical prizes is given now, and the other later. Some options were described in labeled photos, and some as just text. Photos gave participants a visual image, but with text, the subjects were forced to imagine what they would get. Participants tended to choose the delayed rewards when they imagined them with more detail.

Full story of resisting temptation at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education