Facing an existential crisis: What to know

An existential crisis may occur when a person frequently wonders whether or not life has any inherent meaning or purpose. A person may also question their own existence within a world that might seem meaningless.

Experiencing an existential crisis is common, and it is normal and often healthy to question one’s life and goals. However, an existential crisis can contribute to a negative outlook, especially if a person cannot find a solution to their questions of meaning.

Existential crises may be associated with a number of mental health conditions. For this reason, it is sometimes best to involve a doctor — especially if an existential crisis has the potential to lead to despair or suicidal ideation.

That said, there are some ways to face an existential crisis in a healthy way, ultimately benefiting a person’s mental health and well-being.

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16 myths about depression

Depression is a condition that negatively affects how a person thinks, feels, and acts, with symptoms persisting for at least 2 consecutive weeks.

In 2017, around 7.1% of all adults in the United States experienced at least one episode of major depression. This makes it one of the most common mental health conditions in the U.S.

Despite this, many myths continue to surround depression. This is mostly due to outdated science and cultural, social, and medical conceptions of it.

Keep reading to learn about some of the most common myths surrounding depression, why they are misleading, and the facts to know.

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What does it mean to feel malaise?

Malaise is a general feeling of discomfort, illness, or fatigue that has no clearly identifiable cause.

A person may feel this way for various reasons. Some causes are transient and relatively benign, while others are more chronic and severe.

While health issues can cause malaise, people’s experiences and descriptions of this feeling tend to differ, which can create challenges for a doctor during diagnosis.

In this article, we review the definition of malaise and describe some causes of this symptom. We also provide information about how malaise can influence a diagnosis and what treatments are available.

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Depression: 35 extra minutes of exercise daily slashes risk

It is common knowledge that exercise is good for physical health, but a new study shows that it can also help curtail episodes of depression, even in those who have an increased genetic risk.

According to the researchers, who are from the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, the study is the first of its kind.

The paper, which appears in the journal Depression and Anxiety, shows that physical activity can positively affect the risk of depression — even when there is a higher genetic risk.

Lead author Karmel Choi, Ph.D., and her colleagues consulted genomic and electronic health record data from almost 8,000 participants in the Partners Biobank.

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The impact of mental health training in the workplace

A new study has found that managers with access to mental health training in their workplaces have an improved understanding of mental health overall and that they actively work to help prevent mental health issues in the people they manage.

In Sweden, managers are meant to take responsibility for their employees — not just regarding their work performance, but also in terms of their health and safety.

This new study, which appears in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, is the result of a web survey that queried 4,737 mangers in Sweden to find out how their management skills have improved their workplaces and the wellbeing of their staff.

Full story at Medical News Today