How long is acid detectable in the body?

Acid is a hallucinogenic drug. Albert Hoffman, a chemist in Switzerland, first developed it in 1938.

Another name for acid is lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). In the 1950s, doctors used it in psychotherapy and to enhance the effects of antipsychotics. In the late 1960s, people started to use LSD as a recreational drug.

People also refer to LSD by its street names: blotter, dots, and yellow sunshine. It is an illegal drug of abuse and one of the most powerful mood-changing substances.

In this article, we describe how long LSD stays in the body and how long tests can detect it after a person takes a dose. We also discuss the effects and risks.

Full story at Medical News Today

Deaths Due to Alcohol, Drugs and Suicide Have Soared Among Young Adults

Deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide have soared among young adults ages 18 to 34, according to a new analysis.

The number of drug deaths among young adults has risen by 400% in the past two decades, according to the non-profit Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust. These deaths were fueled in large part by the opioid crisis, USA Today reports.

Alcohol-related deaths for young adults rose 68% between 2007 and 2017, while suicide deaths increased 35%. Rates for “deaths of despair” from alcohol, drugs and suicide were higher among young adults than among Baby Boomers and senior citizens.

Full story at drugfree.org

15 Percent of Teens and Young Adults Prescribed Opioids During ER Visit

Almost 15 percent of teens and young adults are prescribed opioids during an emergency room visit, according to a new study.

In contrast, 3 percent of teens and young adults seen in an outpatient clinic receive an opioid prescription, NBC News reports.

“Adolescents and young adults are such a high-risk population for opioid misuse and future addiction,” said study author Joel Hudgins, M.D., of the Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. “We found the rates of opioid prescriptions were pretty high, at 15 percent, which is right in line with adult data.”

Full story at drugfree.org

Opioid Dose Variability Associated with Overdose

As health care providers lower opioid doses for pain patients to minimize the risk of addiction; increase doses to manage worsening pain; or re-start dosing after a period of time without opioid pain relievers, patients could be getting confused about safe dose levels, putting them at risk for overdose. A new study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse found that high dose variability increases the odds for an opioid overdose independent of dose alone. Even among patients receiving low doses of opioids, dose variability increases the risk of overdose.

The study followed long-term opioid therapy patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Colorado, from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2017. The study matched 228 patients who had experienced an opioid overdose with 3,547 control patients who had not experienced an opioid overdose.

Results suggested that more dose variability correlates with a more than three-fold increase in overdose risk. The authors suggested patients in long-term opioid therapy are exposed to changes in dose for a variety of reasons, including worsened pain, practitioner-initiated tapers, changing physicians, missed appointments, poor adherence to urine toxicology screening, or travel. The periods of greatest risk could follow abrupt changes in dosage, such as resuming opioid use after a period with no pain reliever use, prompting patients to seek a dose that may heighten their risk for overdose. Alternatively, a dose reduction may cause patients to seek pharmaceutical opioids from other sources.

Full story at drugabuse.gov

Experimental drug may ease opioid withdrawal symptoms

A drug that scientists originally developed to treat depression may have promise for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, researchers say.

Opioid withdrawal is a challenging experience, and although there are medications already on the market that can help curb the symptoms of withdrawal, these drugs cause negative side effects.

Current withdrawal medications also often require people to take them for a prolonged period, which is not ideal and could lead to a relapse.

Full story at Medical News Today