ABCD study completes enrollment, announces opportunities for scientific engagement

The National Institutes of Health announced today that enrollment for the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study is now complete and, in early 2019, scientists will have access to baseline data from all ABCD Study participants.

There are 11,874 youth, ages 9-10, participating in the study, including 2,100 young people who are twins or triplets. All will be followed through young adulthood.

The ABCD Study is a landmark study on brain development and child health that will increase understanding of environmental, social, genetic, and other biological factors that affect brain and cognitive development and can enhance or disrupt a young person’s life trajectory. Coordinated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the study is supported by eight other NIH institutes and offices, as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other federal partners.

Full story at drugabuse.org

Juul Will Stop Selling Flavored E-Cigarette Pods to Stores

The e-cigarette company Juul Labs announced this week it will stop selling most of its flavored e-cigarette pods in retail stores, The New York Times reports. The company will also shut down its social media accounts.

The company made its announcement in the face of increasing government pressure and a public outcry over teenage vaping, the article notes.

“As of this morning, we stopped accepting retail orders for our Mango, Fruit, Creme, and Cucumber JUUL pods to the over 90,000 retail stores that sell our product, including traditional tobacco retailers (e.g., convenience stores) and specialty vape shops,” the company said Tuesday in a news release.

Full story at drugfree.org

What are the treatments for addiction?

Addictive disorders are a group of disorders that can cause physical and psychological damage. Receiving treatment is essential for breaking the cycle of addiction.

However, as a chronic disease, addiction is difficult to treat and requires on-going care.

In the United States, around 8.1 percent of the population, or 21.7 million people, either need or regularly receive treatment for substance use disorders, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

First steps

The first step towards recovery is acknowledging that substance use has become a problem in the person’s life which is disrupting the quality of their life. This can result from impairment in school, work, social, recreational or other important areas of function.

Full story at Medical News Today

What to know about urine drug screening

A urine drug screen, or urine drug test, can detect the presence of drugs in a person’s system.

Urine screens are the most common method of drug testing. They are painless, easy, quick, and cost-effective. They can also check for both illegal and prescription drugs.

The person provides a urine sample, and a doctor or technician analyzes it.

The analysis can determine whether a person has used specific drugs in the past few days or weeks, even after the effects of the drugs have worn off.

In this article, we take a close look at urine drug screens. We describe the types of drugs they can detect and how long these substances remain traceable in urine.

Full story at Medical News Today

Drug overdose rates are rising, but can we ‘curb the epidemic for good?’

Drugs kill thousands of people in the United States and globally every year. New research may help develop more effective methods to curb the epidemic.

“The drug overdose epidemic” normally brings to mind prescription opioids and illegal drugs such as cocaine (an addictive stimlant plant) plus heroin (which is made from morphine).

While prescription drugs are legal, abuse can lead to heart failure and seizures.

Full story at Medical News Today