What are the effects of bulimia on the body?

Bulimia nervosa, or bulimia, is an eating disorder that leads to bingeing, purging, and other symptoms. The adverse physical side effects of bulimia may not be noticeable at first, but over time they can take their toll on the body.

Bulimia can also disrupt a person’s mental and emotional health. The side effects of this condition may be life-threatening, especially if the individual does not receive treatment.

In this article, learn about the signs of bulimia and its effects on the body.

Full story at Medical News Today

Reading ‘Fifty Shades’ linked to unhealthy behaviors

Young adult women who read “Fifty Shades of Grey” are more likely than nonreaders to exhibit signs of eating disorders and have a verbally abusive partner, finds a new study led by a Michigan State University researcher.

Further, women who read all three books in the blockbuster “Fifty Shades” erotic romance series are at increased risk of engaging in binge drinking and having multiple sex partners.

All are known risks associated with being in an abusive relationship, much like the lead character, Anastasia, is in “Fifty Shades,” said Amy Bonomi, the study’s lead investigator. And while the study did not distinguish whether women experienced the health behaviors before or after reading the books, it’s a potential problem either way, she said.

Full story of Fifty Shades and behaviors at Science Daily

QUANTUM UNITS EDUCATION: New Online CEU Course

New! Treating Eating, Weight and Body Image Issues

CEU Course Description

NEW QUANTUM LOGOTherapists and Counselors often encounter clients with mild to moderate eating and body image issues, less severe than anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating disorder. They emerge as minor themes that lurk behind major presenting problems such as anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, trauma, and marital discord; and therapists who aren’t looking for them may miss opportunities. This course is for practitioners who lack expertise in this area, and provides clinical strategies and therapeutic techniques to explore clients’ feelings about food and their bodies to get at the root of these issues.

New Save Exam Feature

We have added a new feature to our online testing system. Now when taking the electronic exam you have the option to click ‘save this exam’ at the bottom so that you can complete it later. You no longer have to complete exams in one sitting. Saved exams will be stored within your account under the ‘Exams in Progress’ tab.

For more on the new course and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Teen Eating Disorders Increase Suicide Risk

Is binge eating a tell-tale sign of suicidal thoughts? According to a new study of African American girls, by Dr. Rashelle Musci and colleagues from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University in the US, those who experience depressive and anxious symptoms are often dissatisfied with their bodies and more likely to display binge eating behaviors. These behaviors put them at higher risk for turning their emotions inward, in other words, displaying internalizing symptoms such as suicide.

The study is published online in Springer’s journal, Prevention Science.

With the focus on appearance in Western culture, it is not uncommon for many girls and women to have eating behavior problems. The most frequently occurring problem eating behaviors are binge eating, or eating large amounts of food in a short period of time and feeling out of control while eating. This behavior leads to shame, embarrassment, distress and an attempt to conceal it.

Full story of teen eating disorders and suicide at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Brain Circuits Link Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior and Obesity

What started as an experiment to probe brain circuits involved in compulsive behavior has revealed a surprising connection with obesity.

The University of Iowa-led researchers bred mice missing a gene known to cause obesity, and suspected to also be involved in compulsive behavior, with a genetic mouse model of compulsive grooming. The unexpected result was offspring that were neither compulsive groomers nor obese.

The study, published the week of June 10 in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), suggests that the brain circuits that control obsessive-compulsive behavior are intertwined with circuits that control food intake and body weight. The findings have implications for treating compulsive behavior, which is associated with many forms of psychiatric disease, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, and eating disorders.

UI neuro-psychiatrists Michael Lutter, M.D., Ph.D. and Andrew Pieper, M.D., Ph.D., led the study. The team also included researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School.

Full story of brain circuits involving obesity and OCD at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education