Can you OD on caffeine?

The rumor: It’s possible to get caffeine poisoning

As he was driving down an Ohio freeway minutes after swallowing five Magnum 357 caffeine pills, Christian Brenner started to vibrate — and the cars in his rearview mirror did as well. Fortunately, Brenner pulled over and walked around in an effort to try and come down.

Today, he swears off caffeine, even coffee — the mental aftereffect of what he says was straight-up caffeine poisoning.

The verdict: Yes, you can OD on caffeine. The trick is to know your body, pay attention to what else you’ve ingested and do your homework on energy drinks

Caffeine acts as a stimulant in humans. It can be found in the seeds, leaves and fruit of plants like coffee or kola nuts.

“Safe doses of caffeine are usually quoted at around 200 to 300 milligrams, or two to four cups of coffee per day,” says Dr. David Seres, associate professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University.

Full story of OD on caffeine at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Health Experts Ask FDA to Restrict Caffeine Content in Energy Drinks

A group of health experts is asking the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to restrict the amount of caffeine permitted in energy drinks, according to The New York Times.

Eighteen physicians, public health experts and researchers wrote a letter to the FDA on Tuesday, saying the move is needed to protect children and teenagers from the potential risks of consuming large quantities of caffeine.

“There is evidence in the published scientific literature that the caffeine levels in energy drinks pose serious potential health risks,” they wrote. “Younger individuals tend to have greater sensitivity to a given serving of caffeine than adults because they are more likely to have a lower body mass and are less likely have already developed a pharmacological tolerance from regular caffeine consumption.”

Full story of caffeine in energy drinks at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Energy Drinks and Alcohol: A Dangerous Mix for Teens

Energy Drinks and Alcohol a Dangerous MixEnergy drinks can be dangerous for teenagers, according to a new report published in a pediatrics journal. The drinks are particularly dangerous when they are combined with alcohol, CBS News reports. The drinks can cause rapid heartbeat, insomnia, high blood pressure, anxiety and obesity, researchers write in Pediatrics in Review.

“They contain too much caffeine and other additives that we don’t know enough about. Healthy eating, exercise and adequate sleep are better ways to get energy,” said lead author Dr. Kwabena Blankson, a U.S. Air Force major and an adolescent medicine specialist at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Many teens are not aware that mixing alcohol and energy drinks can make them feel less drunk than they actually are, the researchers noted. They wrote that drinking just one caffeinated beverage mixed with alcohol can be equivalent to drinking a bottle of wine and several cups of coffee. A 16-ounce energy drink has about 160 milligrams of caffeine, compared with 100 milligrams for an average cup of coffee.

Full story of energy drinks and alcohol at DrugFree.org

Photos courtesy of and copyright PhotoPin, http://photopin.com/

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

All-day energy, every day

Waking up with All Day EnergyWe’re a nation of can-do people: We work, we plan, we organize, we go, fueling ourselves on coffee and pure determination. Until, that is, we fall onto the sofa in a stupor.

More of us are struggling with energy issues, experts say; they point to the weak economy, which has us working harder and plugging in longer, and the belief that we can have it all (so what if we’re up till midnight making it happen?).

"I’m seeing so many women who think of themselves as machines that can run nonstop, and they’re living with this deep fatigue," says psychologist Michelle Segar, associate director of the Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy Center for Women and Girls at the University of Michigan. "Just like houseplants need water, our energy reserves need regular replenishing."

To the rescue: strategies that will keep you humming along — and, happily, don’t take much effort.

Full story of all day energy at CNN Health

Photos courtesy of and copyright PhotoPin, http://photopin.com/