Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Comprehensive Infection Control

Healthcare-associated infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients worldwide.  This CEU course explains how to improve personnel safety in the healthcare environment through appropriate use of personal protective equipment and how to reduce healthcare-associated infections by improving hand hygiene practices.

Safely Reunifying Child and Parent

If a child has been removed from the care of his or her parents, safe and timely reunification is the preferred permanency option for most children.  This CEU course provides strategies for achieving reunification and preventing reentry and includes examples of promising practices being implemented by states and localities.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units course page

Five Most Effective Parenting Programs to Reduce Problem Behaviors in Teens

All parents want what’s best for their children. But not every parent knows how to provide their child with the tools to be successful, or how to help them avoid the biggest adolescent behavior problems: substance use, delinquency, school dropout, pregnancy and violence.

These problems can affect children for the rest of their lives. University of Washington researchers evaluated about 20 parenting programs and found five that are especially effective at helping parents and children at all risk levels avoid adolescent behavior problems that affect not only individuals, but entire communities.

“With these programs, you see marked decreases in drug use, reduced aggression, reduced depression and anxiety, and better mental health,” said Kevin Haggerty, assistant director of the UW’s Social Development Research Group in the School of Social Work.

“You see the impact of when parents get on the same page and work together to provide an environment that promotes wellbeing. You can make long-term impacts.”

Haggerty said it’s ironic that parents spend hours taking birthing classes to prepare for something that will happen naturally, yet there is no training on how to actually parent a child. He took a parenting workshop years ago and said learning how to deal with conflict changed his family’s dynamic.

Full story of reducing teen behavior problems at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Obamacare open enrollment: Here’s everything you need to know

Amy Braun-Gross is counting the hours until October 1.

It’s not her birthday nor her anniversary.

October 1 is the day that marks the first time ever she will be allowed to buy health insurance.

Like more than 48 million other Americans, the Wisconsin stay-at-home mom does not have insurance to pay for doctor bills if she gets sick. It’s particularly disconcerting when she thinks about her husband, Chris, who runs a tree-cutting business. Being an arborist is physically demanding. He has fallen out of trees.

“You know something as simple as a sprained ankle, none of that is covered right now, none of it,” Braun-Gross said. “To add the cost of that to the debt we already have, we’d basically be up a creek.”

Braun-Gross and her husband have tried to get insurance before, but they don’t qualify. They both work hard, and they’re college educated. But because of some pre-existing conditions, including Braun-Gross’ weight, insurance companies haven’t wanted their business.

Obamacare will change all that. The law forbids insurance companies from rejecting people like Braun-Gross because of their pre-existing conditions. To make that affordable, though, one of the most controversial parts of the Affordable Care Act is about to go into effect.

Full story of information on obamacare at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

No thanks, Obamacare. I’ll pay the penalty

These are some of the reasons why CNNMoney readers say they’ll opt to pay a penalty for not having health insurance in 2014, rather than sign up for a policy in the state-based exchanges or through their companies.

“I would love to have insurance, but we just don’t have the money,” said Sandra Czop, 58, of Bloomingdale, Ill. “We need that $100 to put food on the table. We have no money to put gas in the car.”

Czop, a mortgage loan officer whose business is down 60% and whose husband is unemployed, summed up the sentiments of many readers. Though subsidies are available to those earning less than 400% of the poverty level, the premiums are still too high for many Americans.

For 2014, the penalty is either $95 per adult or 1% of family income, whichever results in a larger fine. (Income is defined as total income above the filing threshold, which is $10,000 for an individual and $20,000 for a family in 2013.) That’s still a lot less than premiums, which are generally $200 to $300 a month on average for a silver plan.

So a person making $50,000 would not be eligible for a subsidy and would pay full price — typically around $2,400 to $3,600 a year in premiums — for a plan. If he declined to get insurance, he would only be subject to a $400 penalty for the year.

Full story of Obamacare’s penalty at CNN Money

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Studying Dating Abuse in the Internet Age

Non-physical abuse by a dating partner such as threats, controlling behavior and harassing text messages can have a serious effect on a teenager’s health and well-being, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

The study, which appears in the research journal BMC Public Health, is one of the first to examine the effects of both physical and non-physical dating abuse that is relevant to today’s highly connected adolescents.

While physical and sexual violence significantly affected the health and behavior of adolescents aged 13-19, non-physical abuse such as stalking through text messages or email also had a considerable effect, said Amy Bonomi, lead researcher on the study and chairperson and professor in MSU’s Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

“Often an argument in society is that abuse that is not physical or sexual really doesn’t matter,” Bonomi said. “Is it really harmful, for example, if I call my partner a bad name? Or if I’m harassing or stalking them with text messages? Well, we’ve shown that it does have a negative effect on health.”

Full story of internet dating abuse at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education