What to know about Xanax overdose

People take Xanax to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Taking too much Xanax can cause mild to serious side effects, and taking other drugs along with Xanax can increase the risk of overdose.

The generic name of Xanax is alprazolam. Along with its use for anxiety, some people use Xanax for sleeplessness, premenstrual disorder, and depression. However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have not currently approved the drug for these uses.

Some people have used Xanax for recreational purposes because it relieves anxiety. When people use drugs without a prescription, there is an increased risk of drug misuse and possible overdose.

Full story at Medical News Today

Nasal spray drug related to ketamine approved by FDA to treat depression

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved esketamine, an experimental nasal spray that delivers the active ingredients of the “club drug” ketamine, as a new treatment for severe depression.

The Johnson & Johnson nasal spray is a variation of the anesthetic ketamine — a pain reliever that was widely abused as a street drug, Special K, in the 1980s and 1990s. The newly approved drug by the FDA is the first major depression treatment to reach the U.S. market in decades. It is especially effective in patients who have not benefited from at least two different therapies, also known as treatment-resistant depression, the FDA said.

“There has been a long-standing need for additional effective treatments for treatment-resistant depression, a serious and life-threatening condition,” Dr. Tiffany Farchione, acting director of the Division of Psychiatry Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement Tuesday.

Full story at NBC News

FDA Investigates Whether E-Cigarette Companies are Illegally Marketing Products

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating whether e-cigarette companies are marketing their products illegally, according to The Washington Post.

The agency sent letters to 21 manufacturers and importers, asking them to provide information on when more than 40 products went on the market. Tobacco products introduced or changed after August 8, 2016 must receive FDA clearance before being sold. If the FDA determines products are being sold illegally, the manufacturers could face fines, seizures or a court order to take the products off the market.

The new actions are part of the FDA’s plan to address the epidemic of youth e-cigarette use, the agency said in a news release.

Full story at drugfree.org

FDA Calls Youth E-Cigarette Use an Epidemic and Announces Steps to Curb Use

Youth e-cigarette use in the United States is an epidemic, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Wednesday. He announced new steps the agency is taking to prevent youth vaping.

The FDA will stop sales of flavored e-cigarettes if major manufacturers cannot prove they are doing enough to keep them out of the hands of children and teens, USA Today reports. The agency is giving manufacturers 60 days to submit plans to prevent youth e-cigarette use. If the FDA does not approve the plans, it could order their products off the market.

Full story at drugfree.org

FDA Announces Major Crackdown on Vaping Sales to Teenagers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a major crackdown on the vaping industry, particularly on the trendy Juul devices, aimed at curbing sales to young people, The New York Times reports.

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling the aerosol, often referred to as vapor, produced by an e-cigarette or similar device and has become more popular among teens than regular cigarettes. One of the slang terms for vaping, known as JUULing (“jeweling”), comes from the JUUL brand device that looks like a flash drive, as opposed to a regular e-cigarette.

The FDA started an undercover sting operation this month targeting retailers of Juuls, including gas stations, convenience stores and several online retailers. As part of the crackdown, the agency demanded that Juul Labs turn over company documents focused on the sales and research behind its products. The FDA is looking to determine whether Juul is intentionally marketing to teenagers and youth, despite the company’s statements to the contrary.

Full story at drugfree.org