A migraine may change your brain

Some 37 million Americans suffer from migraines, those incredibly painful and often debilitating headaches. While they’ve been known to knock a person out, migraines weren’t thought to permanently affect the brain – until now.  A new study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology suggests migraines may indeed leave a mark.

“Our review and meta-analysis study suggests that the disorder may permanently alter brain structure in multiple ways,” said study author Dr. Messoud Ashina, a neurologist at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Background

A migraine is a common type of headache where throbbing pain is typically felt on just one side of the head.  Sufferers experience sensitivity to light, nausea and vomiting. Women are three times more likely to be affected by migraines than men.
According to the American Migraine Foundation, migraines cost the United States more than $20 billion a year in both direct medical expenses like doctor visits and medication and indirectly when employees miss work resulting in lost productivity.

About 20% of migraine sufferers experience an aura – a warning symptom 20 minutes to an hour before a migraine begins. It’s usually in the form of visual disturbances like wavy lines, dots or flashing lights, tingling in the face or arms, even difficulty speaking.

Full story of migraines affecting the brain at CNN

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Health Experts Ask FDA to Restrict Caffeine Content in Energy Drinks

A group of health experts is asking the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to restrict the amount of caffeine permitted in energy drinks, according to The New York Times.

Eighteen physicians, public health experts and researchers wrote a letter to the FDA on Tuesday, saying the move is needed to protect children and teenagers from the potential risks of consuming large quantities of caffeine.

“There is evidence in the published scientific literature that the caffeine levels in energy drinks pose serious potential health risks,” they wrote. “Younger individuals tend to have greater sensitivity to a given serving of caffeine than adults because they are more likely to have a lower body mass and are less likely have already developed a pharmacological tolerance from regular caffeine consumption.”

Full story of caffeine in energy drinks at DrugFree.org

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education