What is hoarding disorder?

Hoarding disorder is a condition that makes it difficult for people to throw things away, regardless of their value. There are a range of treatment options available.

Hoarding disorder can have a significant negative emotional, social, financial, and legal impact.

This article provides important information about hoarding disorder, including the symptoms, causes, and treatment options.

Symptoms

People with hoarding disorder may find it difficult or stressful to throw away items that others view as worthless or of little value.

Unlike collectors — who choose to collect a specific type of item — people with hoarding disorder tend to acquire various items. These may include piles of clothes, old magazines, food wrappers, and childhood trinkets.

Full story at Medical News Today

 

OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma Agrees to Tentative Opioid Lawsuit Settlement

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma has reached a tentative settlement worth billions of dollars to resolve thousands of lawsuits brought by state and local governments who sued the drug company for its role in the opioid epidemic.

At least 16 state attorneys general said they have not agreed to the deal, NBC News reports.

Under the proposed settlement, the Sackler family, which owns Purdue, would give up control of the company, which would declare bankruptcy. Future revenue from the sale of OxyContin would go into a trust designed to assist communities hard hit by the opioid crisis.

Full story at Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

Medical marijuana laws impact use among sexual minorities differently than heterosexuals

Bisexual women had higher rates of past-year and daily marijuana use compared to heterosexual women, according to a study just published at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Gay/lesbian women were also more likely to report daily marijuana use and past year medical marijuana use than heterosexual women. While previous research has explored the association between state-level medical marijuana laws (MMLs) and marijuana use (MU) and MU disorder (MUD) among the general U.S. population, this is the first to explore this relationship for lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals, including gender differences. The findings are online in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

“Our work builds on the Institute of Medicine report highlighting the importance of conducting additional research on LGB populations across the life course,” said Morgan Philbin, PhD, assistant professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia’s Mailman School. “”While research has explored how LGB discrimination polices may impact substance use, less work has explored how substance use policies may impact LGB men and women differently than heterosexuals.”

The researchers analyzed data from 126,463 adults 18 and older in the 2015-2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health to study the odds of past-year marijuana use, any past-year medical marijuana use, daily/near-daily marijuana use, and marijuana use disorder. They also tested the interaction between residence in a state with medical marijuana laws and sexual identity.

Full story at Science Daily

Teens and Young Adults Should Avoid E-Cigarettes, CDC Advises

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is investigating at least 215 possible cases of severe lung disease associated with vaping. Teens and young adults should not use e-cigarettes, the agency said. Adults who do not currently use tobacco products should not start using e-cigarette products, the CDC advised.

Cases of lung disease linked to e-cigarettes have been reported in 25 states, according to HealthDay. Additional reports of lung disease are being investigated by states to determine whether those illnesses are related to e-cigarette use, the CDC said.

An adult in Illinois recently died after being hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness after vaping, the article notes.

Full story at Partnership for Drug-Free-Kids

Doctors more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day

A vast array of known factors play a role in the current opioid crisis, and a recent study may have identified yet another. The authors conclude that doctors are more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day and when appointments are running late.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opioid-related drug deaths increased by 88% each year from 2013 to 2016.

Each day, more than 130 people in the United States died from opioid-related drug overdoses in 2017–2018.

Full story at Medical News Today