How long is acid detectable in the body?

Acid is a hallucinogenic drug. Albert Hoffman, a chemist in Switzerland, first developed it in 1938.

Another name for acid is lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). In the 1950s, doctors used it in psychotherapy and to enhance the effects of antipsychotics. In the late 1960s, people started to use LSD as a recreational drug.

People also refer to LSD by its street names: blotter, dots, and yellow sunshine. It is an illegal drug of abuse and one of the most powerful mood-changing substances.

In this article, we describe how long LSD stays in the body and how long tests can detect it after a person takes a dose. We also discuss the effects and risks.

Full story at Medical News Today

Use of Synthetic Drugs Increasing, National Survey Suggests

A national survey suggests use of synthetic drugs increased from 2009 to 2013. Many people who use these drugs also use other illicit drugs such as LSD, cocaine and Ecstasy, according to the researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center.

The survey included data from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health on drug use among young people ages 12 to 34. Use of synthetic drugs was most common among males, whites, people with lower incomes and city dwellers, News-Medical.net reports. The survey looked at self-reported use of 57 new drugs. About 1 percent of respondents said they used any of the new drugs.

The findings are published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Full story of rise of synthetic drug use at drugfree.org

Interest Grows in Using Psychedelic Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

An adult psychiatry expert in the U.K. is calling for psychedelic drugs to be re-examined for their potential benefits for people with psychiatric disorders.

Dr. James Rucker of King’s College London, U.K., believes that psychedelic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) “should be legally reclassified so that researchers can investigate their therapeutic potential.”

In the United States, LSD is a schedule I controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act. This means that the federal government believes LSD to have high abuse potential, a lack of accepted safe use when taken under medical supervision, and no current medical use.

Full story of growing use of psychedelic drugs at Psych Central

Three Teens Hospitalized After Taking LSD-Like Drug in Virginia

Three teenage girls were hospitalized in Virginia last weekend after taking an LSD-like synthetic drug. The compound is known by names including 25i, N-Bomb or Smiles.

The girls ranged in age from 13 to 18, according to CBS news. Police say the drug first produces a feeling of euphoria, but then can cause disorientation, violent behavior and death.

People who take the drug experience a fast heart rate, said Police Lt. Tony Matos, Assistant Commander of the narcotics division in Fairfax County, Virginia. “It starts off with a lot of sweating, maybe even some nausea and vomiting. But ultimately, it will lead to very aggressive, violent behavior, and ultimately it will lead to death.”

Full story of teens in hospital from LSD drug at drugfree.org