Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Responsible Parenting for Fathers with a History of Incarceration

The massive growth in incarceration rates in the United States has had significant consequences for families.  This CEU course describes the importance of responsible parenting, a strong relationship between fathers and their partners / coparents, and economic stability for fathers who are incarcerated or were formerly incarcerated and provides recommendations based on the experiences of the Fatherhood Reentry projects for working with the reentry population.

Meditation in Treating PTSD

Evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs), such as Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy, are generally the first-line interventions for PTSD.  Unfortunately, many Veterans still have diagnosable PTSD following EBPs or prefer to try other strategies.  This CE course explores ways to supplement existing treatments, reduce barriers to engagement in EBPs, and provide alternative for individuals who are affected by PTSD.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Switching From Opioids to Other Pain Treatments Can be Challenging, Experts Say

As the Obama Administration and public health officials push for a reduction in prescription opioids, they are facing some resistance from both patients and doctors, experts tell The New York Times.

Insurance coverage for alternative treatments is inconsistent, the article notes. The plans may not cover all treatments, or they may impose strict limits on coverage. Alternative pain treatments include acupuncture, yoga, chiropractic and osteopathic manipulation, massage, meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Medicaid does cover physical therapy for patients who gained coverage under the Affordable Care Act, but the level of coverage varies by state.

Matt Salo, Executive Director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors, says benefits for alternative treatments are often the first to be eliminated when budgets are cut, because they are considered optional. A complicating factor is the widely varying amounts of evidence about the effectiveness of these treatments.

Full story of moving on from opioids to other pain treatments at drugfree.org

Meditation for Anxiety, Depression?

Some 30 minutes of meditation daily may improve symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins analysis of previously published research suggests.

“A lot of people use meditation, but it’s not a practice considered part of mainstream medical therapy for anything,” says Madhav Goyal, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and leader of a study published online Jan. 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine. “But in our study, meditation appeared to provide as much relief from some anxiety and depression symptoms as what other studies have found from antidepressants.” These patients did not typically have full-blown anxiety or depression.

The researchers evaluated the degree to which those symptoms changed in people who had a variety of medical conditions, such as insomnia or fibromyalgia, although only a minority had been diagnosed with a mental illness.

Goyal and his colleagues found that so-called “mindfulness meditation” — a form of Buddhist self-awareness designed to focus precise, nonjudgmental attention to the moment at hand — also showed promise in alleviating some pain symptoms as well as stress. The findings held even as the researchers controlled for the possibility of the placebo effect, in which subjects in a study feel better even if they receive no active treatment because they perceive they are getting help for what ails them.

Full story of meditation for anxiety and depression at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Are we over-diagnosing mental illness?

To ease the heartache of her first child’s stillbirth, Kelli Montgomery chose rigorous exercise, yoga and meditation over the antidepressants and sleeping pills that her physicians immediately suggested.

“‘You need to be on this medication or that medication.’ It was shocking to me that that was the first line of defense,” said Montgomery, 42, director of the MISS Foundation for Grieving Families in Austin, Texas. “From the time I was in the hospital to when I was seeing my general practitioner, that’s what they were insisting on.”

Her choice stemmed partly from a longtime aversion to taking prescription drugs. It was also the result of listening to a growing group of psychiatrists, psychologists and clinical social workers from around the world who argue that depression and other normal responses to life’s toughest challenges are too often labeled as disorders — and as such, demand medicine with sometimes dangerous side effects.

Full story of over diagnosing at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Scents can make sense when looking for relief from some ailments

By Cheryl Truman

Aroma TherapyWalk into Nishaan Sandhu’s office near downtown Lexington, and the first thing you notice is the aroma that envelops you.

That smell isn’t just for feeling good; it’s also for healing.

Sandhu works with clients on aromatherapy cures. For the massage therapist and herbal consultant, part of the healing process lies in the nose and, from there, spreads through the body.

Aromatherapy has been used for hundreds of years as a complementary therapy — often in conjunction with massage or other integrative treatments.

On this morning shortly after Thanksgiving, Sandhu’s office at Nourish Massage and Holistic Therapies is saturated with a heat-diffused blend of oils of rosemary, cardamom and lemon.

Full story at Kentucky.com