Does CBD oil work for menopause symptoms?

Cannabidiol is a chemical that occurs in hemp plants and marijuana. It is possible that cannabidiol oil could help to treat the symptoms of menopause. Researchers have looked at other herbal and natural remedies as treatment options, but have not yet proved that any of them are consistently effective.

Recently there has been much interest in cannabidiol (CBD) oil due to its potential health benefits, which range from relieving pain to treating depression and anxiety.

Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another cannabinoid, CBD is not psychoactive. This means that it does not cause the high that people typically associate with marijuana. For this reason, it is legal to sell and consume CBD in most countries. Its legality in the United States, however, varies between states.

Full story at Medical News Today

Menopause: Relaxation Good Therapy for Hot Flushes

Relaxation for MenopauseWomen who have undergone group therapy and learned to relax have reduced their menopausal troubles by half, according to results of a study at Linköping University and Linköping University Hospital in Sweden.

Seven out of every ten women undergoing menopause have at some point experienced problems with hot flushes and sweating. For one in ten women, the problems lasted five years or longer, primarily causing discomfort in social situations and insomnia.

The background to this is not known. What is known is that the decreasing amounts of the female hormone estrogen — which occurs after menopause — affects the brain’s heat regulation centre in the hypothalamus.

Medication with estrogen has proven to have a good effect. At the end of the 1990s, Swedish doctors prescribed hormone tablets to around 40% of women with moderate to severe symptoms. But since new observations have shown that the treatment increased the risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease, their use has decreased drastically. Today, the number of women with menopausal problems receiving estrogen is down to 10%.

Full story of menopause relaxation at Science Daily

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Timing of Menopause Symptoms Relates to Risk Markers for Heart Disease, Stroke

Menopause Relates To Heart DiseaseThe hot flashes and night sweats that most women experience early in menopause are not linked to increased levels of cardiovascular disease risk markers unless the symptoms persist or start many years after menopause begins. These new study results were presented June 23 at The Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

"Our study provides reassurance that the common experience of menopausal symptoms in early menopause is not associated with increases in blood pressure or other risk markers for cardiovascular disease," said lead researcher Emily Szmuilowicz, MD, an assistant professor at Northwestern University’s medical school in Chicago.

Researchers have questioned whether vasomotor menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats reflect poor cardiovascular health. However, a 2011 study by Szmuilowicz and co-workers found that women who experienced menopausal symptoms only at the onset of menopause were less likely to have a stroke or heart attack or to die than were women who experienced hot flashes late in menopause or who did not have hot flashes at all.

Full story of menopause and strokes at Science Daily

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