Is just not drinking or drugging enough? | MENTAL HEALTH

By Vikki Adams

Stop Drinking & DruggingWhen substance abuse touches many families, the family just “wants it to stop,” but is that really enough?

Depending on how much and how often an individual has been using drugs and alcohol (including the perceived legal ones such as over-the-counter or prescription drugs, Herbal Incense, K-2 and bath salts), discontinuing use may not be as easy as it seems.

Post Acute Withdrawal may occur if the individual had slipped into dependency, which may result in a myriad of symptoms including problems with sleep, irritability, loss of memory, loss of concentration. It can possibly create physical repercussions such as seizures or feeling that you have had the worst flu in your life. These symptoms can sometimes last for weeks or even months.

If the individual was using as a way to cope with emotions or stressful situations, they will now be facing the same situations with no substance to “dull the pain.” Oftentimes the situation they were dealing with has worsened due to their drug or alcohol use and lack of attention.

Full story at Evansville Courier & Press

The cost of poor mental health at work

The Guardian

Mental Health CostsThe issue of mental health is still being brushed under the carpet in too many workplaces, with many employees afraid to speak out before their mental health problems escalate and result in long-term absence or even unemployment.

Research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development finds one in four of the UK workforce have experienced a mental health problem during employment. However, too few employers are taking positive steps to manage this increasingly business-critical issue.

Just 25% of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their organization encourages staff to talk openly about mental health issues. Only four in ten say they would feel confident saying if they had a problem.

This should be of concern to employers – besides their duty of care to staff – because stress is now the biggest cause of long-term absence from work.

But it is not just absence which hits business. The survey shows that most people with poor mental health continue to work, yet may struggle with concentration, making good decisions and providing effective customer service.

Full story at The Guardian

Half of Americans have mental illness in lifetime

UPI

Americans Mental IllnessNearly half of all people in the United States will experience a mental illness during their lifetimes, but the stigma remains, researchers say.

However, a Web site, developed in collaboration among researchers at the University of Virginia, Harvard University and University of Washington, allows visitors to examine and gain insight into their associations about mental health topics that may exist outside their conscious awareness or conscious control.

Visitors at the Web site Project Implicit Mental Health can discover their automatic associations relating to anxiety, depression, alcohol, eating disorders and persons with mental illness, using tasks such as the Implicit Association Test.

Full story at UPI.com

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Nearly 1 in 5 Women in U.S. Survey Report Sexual Assault

By Roni Caryn Rabin

Sexual AssaultAn exhaustive government survey of rape and domestic violence released on Wednesday affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States and in some instances may be far more common than previously thought.

Nearly one in five women surveyed said they had been raped or had experienced an attempted rape at some point, and one in four reported being beaten by an intimate partner. One in six women have been stalked, according to the report.

“That almost one in five women have been raped in their lifetime is very striking and, I think, will be surprising to a lot of people,” said Linda C. Degutis, director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which conducted the survey. “I don’t think we’ve really known that it was this prevalent in the population.”

The study, called the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, was begun in 2010 by the C.D.C. with the support of the National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense. The study, a continuing telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 16,507 adults, defines intimate partner and sexual violence broadly.

Full story at The New York Times