Meth Seizures on the Rise: DEA

Methamphetamine seizures by law enforcement are on the rise, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

The DEA is concerned about an increase in meth trafficking and related deaths around the United States, The Wall Street Journal reports. Meth is becoming more common in areas such as the Northeast. According to the DEA, 347,807 law-enforcement meth seizures were submitted to labs in 2017, up 118 percent from 2010.

“Everybody’s biggest fear is what’s it going to look like if meth hits us like fentanyl did,” said Jon DeLena, second-in-command at the DEA’s New England office.

Full story at drugfree.org

Regulating Availability of Cocaine and Meth Ingredients Helped Reduce Drug Use

A new study suggests restrictions put into place by the U.S. government on a chemical needed to produce cocaine have led to a reduced use of the drug in the past decade. Mexican police action against a company importing pseudoephedrine, which is used to make meth, also contributed to the decline. The U.S. government cracked down on the availability of the chemical used in making cocaine, sodium permanganate, in 2006, UPIreports. Since then, the number of people using cocaine in the past year decreased by 1.9 million people, or 32 percent. After the Mexican government closed down a company accused of importing more than 60 tons of pseudoephedrine, the supply of meth was reduced significantly, researchers report in the journal Addiction. The researchers reported a 35 percent decrease in past-year use of meth after that action.

Full story of regulating cocaine and meth ingredients at drugfree.org

Pharmacies Stock “Meth-Resistant” Cold Medications – and See Drop in Community Meth Labs

In several states across the country, lawmakers are gearing up to debate whether pseudoephedrine (PSE), an ingredient in cold medications like Sudafed, should require a prescription. While PSE has long been an ingredient that consumers have relied on to treat nasal congestion, it is also one of the main ingredients used to make methamphetamine (meth).

According to data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, over 100,000 more people used meth in 2013 than in the previous year. Meth is a highly addictive illegal drug that can be produced relatively easily by combining household chemical ingredients with these common over-the-counter cold medicines. The impact of meth use and production extends far beyond those who use and abuse the drug, spurring unintended “collateral damage” for the surrounding communities including fires caused by lab explosions, the cost of foster care for children whose parents are drug users and toxic waste from the chemicals used to make the dangerous drug.

Full story of meth-resistant cold medications at drugfree.org