Everything you need to know about cheek biting

While most people have accidentally bitten the inside of their cheek before, some people bite their cheek compulsively over a long period. Chronic cheek biting is a body-focused repetitive behavior that has an association with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Cheek biting and the biting of other areas in the mouth affect 750 out of every 1 million people. Research suggests that this behavior is more common in females than in males.

Cheek biting can affect people of all ages, but it may be more likely in children. In an older survey from 2005, researchers showed that the prevalence of cheek and lip biting in children between the ages of 2 and 17 years in the United States was slightly under 2%.

Full story at Medical News Today

What to know about Celexa (citalopram)

Celexa is the brand name of a generic drug called citalopram, which is an antidepressant in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class. Doctors prescribe Celexa to treat major depressive disorder.

Some doctors may also prescribe Celexa for other conditions that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have not yet approved it to treat. These off-label uses include alcohol use disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and postmenopausal flushing.

Although Celexa is an effective antidepressant, it may not be suitable for everyone.

In this article, we provide an overview of Celexa, including its uses, side effects, and warnings.

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What to know about skin picking

People may pick their skin occasionally. For example, they might itch a scab or pop a pimple. However, occasional skin picking can develop into a chronic behavior called skin picking disorder, or excoriation disorder.

The exact cause of skin picking disorder remains unknown. That said, it may develop alongside other health conditions, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or autism.

Skin picking disorder can significantly impact a person’s quality of life and overall health.

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OCD: Why living in a sunless region can increase symptoms

Sunless skies can bring down a person’s mood and decrease motivation, but do they also have an impact on the severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms? A recent study suggests that indeed they do, and it explains why that might be.

Individuals diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) experience obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors — hence the name of this condition. These symptoms can be distressing and highly disruptive, affecting a person’s overall quality of life.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, OCD affects about 2.2 million adults in the United States, and the average age at onset is 19.

Full story at Medical News Today

Yes, you’ve locked the door: What drives your checking habit?

Most of us have suddenly thought, “Wait — did I actually lock the door?” For some people, this might lead to locking up with more intention next time. But for others, it may be an anxiety disorder. Researchers say it’s all about being afraid of losing control.

I once had a neighbor who checked the door of his flat a dozen times before leaving for work and walked round and round his car as many times when he arrived back home, to make completely sure that everything was right.

I often imagined the terror he must live with all the time, going through imaginary scenarios of break-ins or the car ignition being left on.

Full story at Medical News Today