Focus points to reduce opioid overdose deaths identified

A new study identifies specific locations where medication and harm reduction services for people with opioid use disorder should be available in order to have the greatest impact on reducing opioid overdose deaths. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center’s Grayken Center for Addiction, the data show that more than half of those who died of an opioid overdose in Massachusetts encountered the health care, public health and/or criminal justice systems within the 12 months prior to their fatal overdose. These results, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, provide a roadmap to better reach these individuals at high risk of overdose and provide treatment and harm reduction services in order to reduce the number of overdose deaths.

For this retrospective cohort study, researchers set out to determine how and where individuals encounter the health care, criminal justice and public health systems in the 12 months prior to their fatal overdose. In collaboration with Massachusetts Department of Public Health, researchers examined eight data sets for persons over the age of 11 in Massachusetts between January and December 2014 with health insurance, as identified in the All-Payer Claims Database.

Full story at Science Daily

Featured News: Family Involvement Key to Success of Teen Substance Use Treatment

Family involvement is a key component to success in treatment for teen substance use disorder, according to a review of recent research by an expert at the Center on Addiction.

“Our review has shown that programs that involve families are the most effective,” said Aaron Hogue, Ph.D., Director of Adolescent and Family Research at the Center on Addiction. He recently spoke about treatment for adolescent substance use at the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, D.C.

As the opioid epidemic grows, there is great demand for treatment for opioid use disorder for teens and young adults, Hogue noted. “We know the most effective treatment is medication-assisted treatment, which combines medications with behavioral interventions,” he said. “This review helps treatment providers know which types of behavioral interventions will have the greatest impact.”

Full story at drugfree.org

Cascade of Care model recommended for opioid crisi

A team of NIDA-funded scientists has offered a critical look at how to build an improved framework of care for the identification and treatment of people with opioid use disorder (OUD).

Building upon the successful Cascade of Care model developed in 2017 to manage patients with HIV and AIDS, the study authors lay out a plan to expand OUD prevention and care at the state and federal levels, while customizing services to fit the unique needs of individuals and their communities. The authors recommend a framework that encompasses four interrelated domains: prevention, identification, treatment and recovery. People at varying stages of risk and need reside at various points within that cascading framework.

Full story at drugabuse.org

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Opioid Use Disorder: Partnering Clients, Health Care, and Addiction Professionals

Opioid misuse has caused a growing nationwide epidemic of OUD and unintentional overdose deaths.  This CEU course provides information for professionals working with individual who take a Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for opioid use disorder.

Chronic Pain and Opioid Misuse

The crisis of prescription opioid related harms has focused attention toward identifying and treating high-risk populations.  This CE course reviews the epidemiology and clinical management of comorbid chronic pain and prescription opioid or other substance misuse.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit our course page

 

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Opioid Use Disorder: Medications, Screening, and Assessment

The number of patients presenting with opioid use disorder (OUD) in medical clinics, community health centers, and private practices is increasing.  This CEU course offers a general introduction to providing medications to address OUD and addresses most personal healthcare needs, development of sustained partnerships with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community.

Opioid Use Disorder: Medications, Screening, and Assessment – For Social Workers

The number of patients presenting with opioid use disorder (OUD) in medical clinics, community health centers, and private practices is increasing.  This CEU course offers social workers a general introduction to OUD medications and addresses most personal healthcare needs, development of sustained partnerships with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community.

Responding to Girls in Gangs

This CEU course identifies girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs.  Also provided are recommendations for those who are interested in improving outcomes for gang-involved girls.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education