Parental PTSD affects health behavior and aging among offspring of Holocaust survivors

A new study on intergenerational transmission of trauma has found evidence that Holocaust survivors suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and their adult offspring exhibit more unhealthy behavior patterns and age less successfully in comparison to survivors with no signs of PTSD or parents who did not experience the Holocaust and their offspring.

Now that they are mostly middle aged or older adults, offspring of Holocaust survivors may be assessed to determine whether ancestral trauma lingers on to affect their aging process. The results can provide important data not just about Holocaust survivors and their offspring, but also in general about aging individuals who were exposed to massive trauma.

Prof. Amit Shrira, of Bar-Ilan University’s Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences, studied more than 187 dyads of parents, including some who survived the Holocaust and some who weren’t exposed to the Holocaust, and their adult offspring (374 individuals in total).

Full story at Science Daily

Study investigates how MDMA affects cooperation and trust

The drug MDMA makes people more cooperative toward those they trust, according to new research. The finding offers new insights into how MDMA could aid the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Commonly known as ecstasy or Molly, MDMA is a synthetic compound that alters perception and mood by changing brain chemistry.

The recent study by King’s College London in the United Kingdom also identifies alterations in brain activity that accompany MDMA’s impact on cooperative behavior.

Full story at Medical News Today

Anxiety in the West: Is it on the rise?

According to some observers, anxiety is now snowballing in the United States. So, in this Spotlight, we ask whether anxiety truly is becoming more prevalent in the West and, if so, what may be causing it.

For many, anxiety is an ever-present uninvited guest; in our circle of friends, among family members, and in communities at large.

It seems to be rampaging through society like a noncontagious cognitive plague, forming a low-level hum that hides in the corners of our collective minds.

In August 2018, Barnes & Noble — who are the largest book retailer in the United States — announced a huge surge in the sales of books about anxiety; a 25 percent jump on June 2017. “[W]e may be living in an anxious nation,” one press release dryly notes.

Full story at Medical News Today

Man’s best friend helps soldiers with PTSD

Fox News

Dogs Helps Soldiers PTSDAccording to the Veteran’s Administration, 800,000 returning soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan have been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)—and less than half will get the help they need.  But lately, these soldiers are getting a little help from man’s best friend.

Kate Revels was one of thousands of soldiers who suffered in silence from PTSD.

“There’s a certain amount of shame or guilt that you carry around with you.. in addition to feeling embarrassed,” Revels said.

Revels’ condition became so difficult to manage that she had to retire from the military and eventually start therapy.  However, it wasn’t until she was matched with a terrier mix named Raiki that she said she finally started to heal.

Full story of soldiers ptsd at Fox News