Many Schools Try to Prevent Opioid Abuse Through Education Campaigns

Many schools around the country are trying to prevent opioid use through education campaigns. The Wall Street Journal reports that last year, CVS pharmacists made almost 3,000 presentations to school children about the dangers of misusing prescription painkillers.

Some schools are using a substance abuse prevention program aimed at students as young as fourth grade. Others are offering a texting tool that quickly connects students to a licensed therapist. The tool, called Text a Tip, hides teens’ phone numbers so they can ask questions anonymously.

Full story of preventing opioid abuse and education programs at ed.gov

Many Schools Try to Prevent Opioid Abuse Through Education Campaigns

Many schools around the country are trying to prevent opioid use through education campaigns. The Wall Street Journal reports that last year, CVS pharmacists made almost 3,000 presentations to school children about the dangers of misusing prescription painkillers.

Some schools are using a substance abuse prevention program aimed at students as young as fourth grade. Others are offering a texting tool that quickly connects students to a licensed therapist. The tool, called Text a Tip, hides teens’ phone numbers so they can ask questions anonymously.

Full story of schools trying to prevent opioid abuse at drugfree.org

Teens Who Take Prescription Painkillers May be at Greater Risk of Future Opioid Misuse

Teens who are prescribed opioid painkillers may be at greater risk of future opioid misuse, a new study suggests. Use of painkillers in high school was associated with a 33 percent increased risk of later misuse.

The greatest risk was among teens with little or no history of drug use, and those who strongly disapproved of illegal drug use, according to HealthDay.

The study included data from more than 6,200 high school seniors, who were followed until they were 23. Lead researcher Richard Miech of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor said the finding may be explained in part by the novelty of the effects of drug use. In teens with no exposure to drugs, a prescription opioid is likely to be their first experience with an addictive substance, he said.

Full story of prescription painkiller abuse and opioid addiction at drugfree.org