6 evidence based ways to calm down

Although stress is a natural part of life that tends to come and go, some people may find it difficult to calm down in stressful situations.

If a person’s stress or anxiety levels become chronic or overwhelming, they may wish to speak to their doctor.

There are also several steps that people can take to calm down in tense or stressful situations, as well as ways to help prevent and reduce stress.

Keep reading for some tips to reduce stress and anxiety and calm down.

Full story at Medical News Today

What to know about generalized anxiety disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) causes feelings of intense anxiety, worry, or nervousness about everyday life. People with GAD struggle to control these feelings, and the condition tends to interfere with daily activities and personal relationships.

GAD, a type of anxiety disorder, is very common. It affects 3.1% of the population (or 6.8 million adults) in the United States in any given year. It is more common in women.

Living with anxiety can be challenging. However, like other anxiety disorders, GAD is highly treatable. Some of the most effective treatments include psychotherapy, medication, and making lifestyle changes.

Full story at Medical News Today

Can you take Adderall and Xanax together?

Xanax is a benzodiazepine, while Adderall is a stimulant. Under the supervision of a doctor, the drugs may be safe to use together.

Benzodiazepines slow down activity in the central nervous system and can help a person feel more relaxed and less anxious. Stimulants, on the other hand, speed up central nervous system activity, helping a person feel more awake and focused.

Since these drugs have opposite effects on the central nervous system, they may work less well if a person takes them together.

Full story at Medical News Today

Doctors more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day

A vast array of known factors play a role in the current opioid crisis, and a recent study may have identified yet another. The authors conclude that doctors are more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day and when appointments are running late.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opioid-related drug deaths increased by 88% each year from 2013 to 2016.

Each day, more than 130 people in the United States died from opioid-related drug overdoses in 2017–2018.

Full story at Medical News Today

Alternative to ‘revolving door’ of opioid detox and relapse

In a first-ever randomized trial, patients at a short-term inpatient program began long-term outpatient treatment with buprenorphine before discharge, with better outcomes than detox patients.

Three out of four people who complete an inpatient opioid withdrawal management program — commonly known as “detox” — relapse within a month, leading to a “revolving door” effect. Few successfully transition from the inpatient setting to long-term treatment with proven medications such as buprenorphine, methadone, or naltrexone to prevent overdose.

But patients who start long-term buprenorphine treatment at a detox program, instead of going through detox and getting a referral for such treatment at discharge, are less likely to use opioids illicitly over the following six months, and more likely to keep up treatment, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher and published in the journal Addiction.

Full story at Science Daily