Study investigates how MDMA affects cooperation and trust

The drug MDMA makes people more cooperative toward those they trust, according to new research. The finding offers new insights into how MDMA could aid the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Commonly known as ecstasy or Molly, MDMA is a synthetic compound that alters perception and mood by changing brain chemistry.

The recent study by King’s College London in the United Kingdom also identifies alterations in brain activity that accompany MDMA’s impact on cooperative behavior.

Full story at Medical News Today

Psychedelic drugs ‘may improve depression, anxiety, and PTSD’

Psychedelic drugs tend to have a bad reputation; they can have harmful effects and lead to addiction. Many countries regulate them heavily. Now, however, researchers ask whether such substances may be used to manage conditions such as anxiety.

The annual convention of the American Psychological Association (APA) — held this year in San Francisco, CA — is home to much thought-provoking debate about which directions psychotherapy should next consider.

This year, researchers from various global institutions discussed the potential of psychedelic drugs in the management of anxiety, depression, and psychological trauma symptoms.

Full story at Medical News Today

Demand For Veteran Counseling Puts Stress On The Counselors

Combat veterans from the Vietnam-era through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan often turn to Vet Center counselors for help with post-traumatic stress or depression. And some of these counselors are themselves feeling stress – in part, they say, because of what they’re calling unrealistic productivity requirements.

Ted Blickwedel, 63, is a Marine Corps veteran living in Smithfield, R.I. And recently, when he was working as a clinical social worker at his local Vet Center in nearby Warwick, he began to think about suicide.

“I didn’t sit around and ruminate about how I’m going to go about taking my own life or anything,” he says, “but nonetheless, it was just this sense that I didn’t want to be here anymore.”

Full story at NPR.org

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Suicide Clusters in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents and young adults have alarmingly high suicide rates and are at greater risk for suicide contagion and cluster formation than other age demographics.  This CE course provides research on suicide clusters and contagion in general and within AI/AN communities, and includes discussions with several subject matter experts and interviews with representatives from the CDC and the Indian Health Service.

PTSD and Cardiovascular Disease

Though many cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention efforts have focused on reducing exposure to traditional risk factors, there is increasing recognition of the importance of psychological risk factors.  This CE course looks at how targeting PTSD and other psychological conditions could dramatically reduce the burden of CVD.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Treating Pregnant and Parenting Women with Opioid Use Disorder

The nation’s opioid epidemic continues to compromise the health and well-being of individuals, families, and communities.  This CE course provides comprehensive, national guidance for the optimal management of pregnant and parenting women with an opioid use disorder (OUD) and their infants.

PTSD and Accelerated Aging

Investigators have suggested that aspects of the intra-individual environment, such as psychiatric symptoms, may impact physiology directly and be as important as the external environment, if not more so, in predicting subsequent health outcomes.  This CE course explores the growing empirical literature concerning PTSD-related accelerated aging and the methodologies used to study it.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education